Statement of Intent

Self guided education

Academies vs. Contemporary (Interdisciplinary) Schools

Academies are discipline based.

Focused on certain types of media (drawing and painting)

Generally focused on certain subject matter (the figure)

3 figures

via GIPHY

“How then might the art school better reflect the conditions of contemporary art? How can art school curriculum apply the interdisciplinary, process‐based and collaborative logic of much contemporary art practice? One alternative to the discipline‐based model is that of the ‘open studio’ practiced . The open studio marks a significant departure from the structure of the conventional art school in a number of ways.   Firstly, the open studio is non‐disciplinary in its approach to art‐making: students are not streamed according to medium or discipline. In preference to notions of medium, students are encouraged to engage with the more urgent issue of practice – that is, the way in which subjectivity and process unfold as a continuum of enquiry in the art studio. That is, students are immersed from the outset in a studio framework that prioritises the essential problem of developing and sustaining an art practice. The tendency of most discipline‐based courses is to introduce independent practice. Independent practice is treated as an advanced competency that develops out of the sound grounding in a specific medium.

 

What media do you want to work with?

 

What techniques do you wish to mimic/build upon?

 

Who are other artists working with similar media?

 

passion

 

 

Suggestions of Components for an SOI

Section One:

(i) Working title of theme of Final Major Project

(ii) What you will work towards producing.

Section Two:

(iii) Influences, starting points, contextual references.

(iv) Early ideas, research and sources (it is recommended that you include a short list of research sources and bibliography).

Section Three:

(v) Intended techniques, media, processes. (vi) Timescales (an action plan would be beneficial).

Section Four:

(vii) Proposed method of evaluations (how you will critically review and analyse your FMP) – remember that for unit 9 you are required to produce a supporting statement which can be used as the focus of your evaluation. You are advised that the bibliography and time scale may be attached to the Statement as an appendix. Your Statement of Intent must be no less than 300 words and no more than 500 words.

 

Examples of documentation

https://grumpusart.wordpress.com/the-caffeine-diaries/

http://23gallery.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/FMP.pdf

Examples of SOIs

http://www1.edexcel.org.uk/diplomaartdesign/site/documents/Sample%20FMP%20work/ISAAC%20OGUNBITAN.pdf

http://www1.edexcel.org.uk/diplomaartdesign/site/documents/Sample%20FMP%20work/SCHENELL%20STEPHENS%20SOI.pdf

 
What do artists do all day?

Making it in the little leagues of Graphic Design with Aaron Draplin

Overview of week 1

– Monday: General introduction to Final Major Project, assignment given and state whether you are a intending to do Experimental Media or Graphic Design. Jeremiah will introduce you to what is meant by an Statement of Intent.

– Tuesday: Instead of your 12.50 class you will be expected to go to the Visiting Artist & Lecturer Series. The artist’s name is Jesus Palomino and the location is Room 001 in Blanicka at 5pm which is after your first EMD class with Franco. Check the noticeboard for further details…

– Wednesday: Everyone must have at least 2 potential ideas ready to discuss for your Final Major Project, along with some initial research to help explain your ideas. Groups are then announced.

– Friday: Everyone will meet for further discussion of your ideas along with further research with Sean in relation to writing a formal Statement of Intent (SOI) One idea will be selected from the two. Groups are then announced.

This week Students will firstly be expected to suggest at least 2 potential ideas for a Final Major Project (FMP) on Wednesday during Sean’s session. They must then do some further initial research about both ideas to explain and justify their 2 concepts and have this ready for their class with Sean on Friday.

It is important to come up with ideas that have a strong concept or theme and a depth of thought so that a number of pieces or a very in-depth and involved single piece of work can be produced. Remember this piece of work is also ultimately about achieving merits and distinctions.

During your classes with either Sean or Jeremiah you should agree with your lecturer which of your 2 concepts will be the final version to work up into a proper SOI (statement of intent) and you should bring a first typed draft of this to your next class. You will also be expected to produce your own realistic working timeline of how you envisage your work progressing.

When you prepare your final SOI you must also create a planner for the whole semester. This must be submitted with your final SOI and its creation must be taken seriously

 

What’s a statement of Intent?

 

“The statement of intent: a reflective, concise piece of writing which details, evaluates, and contextualises each student’s self- authored project designed to identify and build upon personal aptitudes and strengths and articulate ideas clearly. An essential and transferable skill required for career progression as an artist practitioner.

You must create a plan, which can be managed, reviewed, and evaluated, and this will show how your own development will be articulated. You must choose proper resources to inform your work, create a way of collecting all of your information (via a blog or a sketchbook) and DOCUMENT DOCUMENT DOCUMENT all of your process. Did I mention you need to DOCUMENT your process? Yeah. Because if you don’t you’ll fail. 

Reflect on what drives you as an artist. Whether you are driven by the beauty of nature or rebelling against government oppression, search your past for any defining moments that may have shaped your perspective. Write these memories down on scrap paper as a reference source while writing your statement of purpose.

Research the artistic benefits of study in each studio art program you wish to apply to. Review the artwork of the instructors and read their personal biographies. This information should be available on the program website. Be certain to note how each program has the potential to enhance your artwork. Identify anything about your art or your personal character that may be an asset to these programs.

Open your statement of purpose with a compelling statement in three sentences that sums up your passion, your direction and your motivation for being an artist.

Explain your artwork and your experience as an artist in one to two paragraphs. Discuss any important courses taken in college that helped to shape your art, including any professors who influenced you.

 

Here’s a link with a couple hundred examples of blogs which focus on certain genres and fields relating to art and design. However, you’ll also be combining your research, with your own documentation of your work.

 

 

 
 

 

Line Variation and Observational Drawing

Line Variation.

Drawing #13 “Line Variation Shoe”

In these drawings you are going to be exploring line variation. It is important that the lines in your drawings have varying thicknesses. Because of its versatility and ability to make highly varied lines we will be using a brush and ink. This will make the drawing appear more lively and dynamic. Later on will start exploring how different line thicknesses can also give a drawing “weight” but for this first drawing just trust your intuition and vary the thickness of your line. Before you start the shoe drawing I want you to fill up a page full of extremely varied squiggly lines. Get used to your brush and the type of line it makes, how it responds to different pressures. Then, once you feel comfortable you are going to move onto drawing your shoe. You may feel a bit of trepidation when you start the shoe drawing

line-variation

because ink is so permanent, and there’s no eraser. This should only make you concentrate harder. If you screw up a line, don’t worry about it. Remember the practice is the most important thing at this point and not the finished drawing. Take 5 minutes to fill up a page full of squiggly, highly varied, lines, and then another hour doing at least two shoe drawings.

shoe-brush-drawing-med

Sketchbook: Drawing #14 “Line Variation Braids”

For this drawing you are going to have use you imagination. You are going to be creating an abstract drawing with form using nothing but line, and your brush. The structure of the drawing is simple. The bigger fatter lines come as all the lines converge at a certain point. You can make the shapes any way you want but just play with the thicknesses of your lines

line-variation-braid-med

Drawing Skills: Measuring

Lesson 9

This lesson will deal with learning how to improve your drawing skills by creating a unit of measurement for drawing. You will use your pencil to measure and draw a still life which will be set up in front of you. In the first drawing by Honore Daumier you can see that the practice goes back many hundreds of years. People still use it, because it works.

daumier-pupil-teacher-drawing

All you have to do is hold a pencil or brush at arms length, close one eye, and move your thumb up or down the pencil to make a measurement. then compare that measurement to something else. Check out these two photos of me measuring distances between points on my guitar.
drawing-skills
Here I measure from the bottom of the hole to where the neck meets the body.

measurement-drawing-2

I then keep my thumb in the same place on the pen, and compare my first measurement against the new one. Now I can make a better estimate as to how wide I need to draw the guitar. Judging from this photo it is about 1 and 1/3 pens wide at that point. Now correlate these measurements onto the paper in front of you. Remember, you don’t have to draw it to the scale of your pen measurements. Once you’ve committed to the first initial marks on your drawing you have already created a measuring system.Your units can be whatever size you desire.

Drawing #16 – Measuring and drawing a corner of the room.

For this drawing I want you to draw a corner of the room while using this technique. Set aside one hour of time for this drawing and keep measuring and drawing until the hour expires. Remember that it is important to get a base unit of measurement first!

Drawing Plants and Animals with Simple Forms

ineo754-20150316104400

 

cacti

Drawing Form

Lesson 8

Now that we have got a good grasp of line, and the importance of varying our lines in our drawing we are going to continue on to another huge element of drawing/painting. That important element is form. Correctly understanding form will give your paintings/drawings more depth. Traditionally schools have taught students to look for four key forms. These are The Cube, The Cylinder, The Sphere, and variations and combinations of these forms.

cube

cylinders

drawing-form

Using combinations of these three basic forms can enable to draw virtually anything on the planet. It is no mistake that all of the 3D animation software available on the market utilizes these three forms. So why is this important for drawing and painting? So far we’ve been examining what we can see with our own eyes and trying to duplicate it, however, we must remember that we are trying to render the 3 dimensional world onto a 2 dimensional surface. These common forms are like letters which create words. To put it simply our brains know how to read these forms when we see them.

I want you to start seeing everything as if it were transparent in an attempt to better understand the underlying form which holds it all together. For hundreds of years people in figure drawing classes will often stand up and look at both sides of the model which they are drawing. They do this because they want to see how the whole form works together. The angle from which you look at a subject is important, and as an artist you want to gather as much information as possible about the subject you are drawing. That means thinking about what you can’t see, as well as can see. Keep your edges soft and rounded. We don’t want anyone to get hurt if your creature runs into them.

Drawing #15 Industrial Drawing of an animal

For this drawing I want you to find a picture of an animal, and draw it only using these basic forms. Think of yourself as if you are making a schematic drawing. You want to make a detailed blueprint of this animal because you are going to put it into a rocketship and blast it off to a foreign planet. Where no one knows what a French Bulldog (or the animal of your choice) looks like. 😉

This lesson is especially great for those interested in pursuing a career in 3d animation. Most people don’t realize, but all those characters in all of those big budget animation films start off with a sketch. That’s right. Good old fashioned pen and paper.

You may take up to 2 hours to complete this drawing. Make it as detailed as possible.

french-bulldog-drawing

Casting Class in Prague

bird

 

Casting Class

June 8th – June 26th

Prague College Summer 2015

Lindz Lew

 

Overview:

This course will introduce students to the creation of 1 part and 2 part molds and casting techniques.

The complexity of the molds will be scaffolded, beginning with a basic 1 part mold and moving on to 2 part molds. In the third week we will explore different casting materials.

There will be a heavy emphasis on craftsmanship and concept as well as the final sculptural composition and design quality. Students will be required to design and create a functional 1 part mold and 2 part mold and present a finished work of art in the final days of class. This final project will consist of 2 sets of multiples of a 3D form created from at least 3 different materials and pulled from both the 1 part mold and the 2 part mold created in the 1st and 2nd weeks of the class.

 

Learning Outcomes:

L01: Demonstrate the ability to understand and apply the basic principles of mold making techniques.

LO2: Demonstrate the ability to create a functioning 1 part mold.

LO3: Demonstrate the ability to create a functioning 2 part mold.

LO4: Create a body of work using multiples.

LO5: Explore the history and importance of multiples.

 

What we will actually do in class:

The class will be focused on creating multiples using casting techniques.

 

Week 1

  1. Introduction to casting.
  2. Exploration of multiples as art throughout history.
  3. Discussion about the power of multiples throughout the ages.
  4. Design and construction of one part molds.
  5. Presentation of 3 multiples derived from one part molds in 3 different materials.

 

Week 2

  1. Introduction to 2 part molds.
  2. How to design a functional 2 part mold.
  3. Planning a body of work derived from a 2 part mold.
  4. Creation of a 2 part mold.
  5. Test the functionality of the 2 part mold.

 

Week 3

  1. Casting in multiples from various materials.
  2. Experimenting with casting in different materials such as gelatin, soap, wax, etc.
  3. Developing a well-crafted body of work featuring multiples in at least 3 different materials.
  4. Final presentations of work.

 

List of Finished Works/projects:

2 1 part molds

1 2 part mold

3 1 part mold castings in 3 different materials

3 2 part mold castings in 3 different materials.

 

Materials Needed by Students:

Shoeboxes

Oil based clay

Wax

Plaster

Spray release

Vaseline

Buckets

Water

Nitrile gloves

Respirator and/or fine mesh dust mask for plaster

faces

 

Experimental Hand Drawn Animations

Scenario:

For this assignment you will be creating a character (or abstract shape), which exists in a certain environment, and you will be animating your character/shape via no less than 100 hand drawn frames. (P2.2) There are various stages which need to be presented in order to successfully finish this assignment. From simple sketching and storyboarding, and idea generation, to a finished drawing of the environment  in which you wish the character to inhabit. One finalized drawing of your character,  one finalized of the environment, and the final animation must be submitted. Students will be encouraged to utilize their strengths in drawing and apply it to the necessary media as well as production. (P4.1)

 

You are allowed to incorporate scanned textures, photos, draw on peoples bodies, etc in the creation of this work. You may use programs such as Toon Boom, or Flash however each frame must still be hand drawn, and all frames must be exported individually as well.  Students are NOT bound to creating this work simply as a 100 frame animation in the traditional sense, but my hopes are that students blend a multitude of media to create both the character, the movement, and the environment in which it/he/she resides. (D1) Judging by the speed at which students work, they will be encouraged to add sound or other effects to their animations in post-production.

Be aware that the storyboarding for this assignment does not have to be adhered to in the traditional sense. A storyboard can simply be a working document which helps plan your work and guides the process.

 

What will be submitted?

Storyboards ( scanned)

Sketches   (scanned)

Finalized Environment

Finalized Character

All of your frames

Finalized and compressed animation (must be less than 500 mb in size!)

 

 

Examples and Inspiration

Brain Lapse by Jake Fried 2014.
Hand-drawn animation with ink, white-out, coffee and collage.
More at http://www.inkwood.net

Animation experiment, photographing charcoal drawings and transferring them to my laptop, using Adobe Flash CS3 for animation and Adobe Premiere Elements 7.0 for editing.
Largely rotoscoped.

The Umbrella is a short animated film produced in Griffith Film School. The animation has been made with oil painting on glass.

A collection of works from the BFA1 class in Experimental Animation. Edited by Jamie Tan.

I made the video in ToonBoom Animate 3.

 

Drawing Plants with simple forms

ineo754-20150316104400

 

cacti

Drawing Form

Lesson 8

Now that we have got a good grasp of line, and the importance of varying our lines in our drawing we are going to continue on to another huge element of drawing/painting. That important element is form. Correctly understanding form will give your paintings/drawings more depth. Traditionally schools have taught students to look for four key forms. These are The Cube, The Cylinder, The Sphere, and variations and combinations of these forms.

cube

cylinders

drawing-form

Using combinations of these three basic forms can enable to draw virtually anything on the planet. It is no mistake that all of the 3D animation software available on the market utilizes these three forms. So why is this important for drawing and painting? So far we’ve been examining what we can see with our own eyes and trying to duplicate it, however, we must remember that we are trying to render the 3 dimensional world onto a 2 dimensional surface. These common forms are like letters which create words. To put it simply our brains know how to read these forms when we see them.

I want you to start seeing everything as if it were transparent in an attempt to better understand the underlying form which holds it all together. For hundreds of years people in figure drawing classes will often stand up and look at both sides of the model which they are drawing. They do this because they want to see how the whole form works together. The angle from which you look at a subject is important, and as an artist you want to gather as much information as possible about the subject you are drawing. That means thinking about what you can’t see, as well as can see. Keep your edges soft and rounded. We don’t want anyone to get hurt if your creature runs into them.

Drawing #15 Industrial Drawing of an animal

For this drawing I want you to find a picture of an animal, and draw it only using these basic forms. Think of yourself as if you are making a schematic drawing. You want to make a detailed blueprint of this animal because you are going to put it into a rocketship and blast it off to a foreign planet. Where no one knows what a French Bulldog (or the animal of your choice) looks like. 😉

This lesson is especially great for those interested in pursuing a career in 3d animation. Most people don’t realize, but all those characters in all of those big budget animation films start off with a sketch. That’s right. Good old fashioned pen and paper.

You may take up to 2 hours to complete this drawing. Make it as detailed as possible.

french-bulldog-drawing

Intro To FMP

What do artists do all day?

Making it in the little leagues of Graphic Design with Aaron Draplin

Overview of week 1

– Monday: General introduction to Final Major Project, assignment given and state whether you are a intending to do Experimental Media or Graphic Design. Jeremiah will introduce you to what is meant by an Statement of Intent.

– Tuesday: Instead of your 12.50 class you will be expected to go to the Visiting Artist & Lecturer Series. The artist’s name is Jesus Palomino and the location is Room 001 in Blanicka at 5pm which is after your first EMD class with Franco. Check the noticeboard for further details…

– Wednesday: Everyone must have at least 2 potential ideas ready to discuss for your Final Major Project, along with some initial research to help explain your ideas. Groups are then announced.

– Friday: Everyone will meet for further discussion of your ideas along with further research with Sean in relation to writing a formal Statement of Intent (SOI) One idea will be selected from the two. Groups are then announced.

This week Students will firstly be expected to suggest at least 2 potential ideas for a Final Major Project (FMP) on Wednesday during Sean’s session. They must then do some further initial research about both ideas to explain and justify their 2 concepts and have this ready for their class with Sean on Friday.

It is important to come up with ideas that have a strong concept or theme and a depth of thought so that a number of pieces or a very in-depth and involved single piece of work can be produced. Remember this piece of work is also ultimately about achieving merits and distinctions.

During your classes with either Sean or Jeremiah you should agree with your lecturer which of your 2 concepts will be the final version to work up into a proper SOI (statement of intent) and you should bring a first typed draft of this to your next class. You will also be expected to produce your own realistic working timeline of how you envisage your work progressing.

When you prepare your final SOI you must also create a planner for the whole semester. This must be submitted with your final SOI and its creation must be taken seriously

 

What’s a statement of Intent?

 

“The statement of intent: a reflective, concise piece of writing which details, evaluates, and contextualises each student’s self- authored project designed to identify and build upon personal aptitudes and strengths and articulate ideas clearly. An essential and transferable skill required for career progression as an artist practitioner.

You must create a plan, which can be managed, reviewed, and evaluated, and this will show how your own development will be articulated. You must choose proper resources to inform your work, create a way of collecting all of your information (via a blog or a sketchbook) and DOCUMENT DOCUMENT DOCUMENT all of your process. Did I mention you need to DOCUMENT your process? Yeah. Because if you don’t you’ll fail. 

Reflect on what drives you as an artist. Whether you are driven by the beauty of nature or rebelling against government oppression, search your past for any defining moments that may have shaped your perspective. Write these memories down on scrap paper as a reference source while writing your statement of purpose.

Research the artistic benefits of study in each studio art program you wish to apply to. Review the artwork of the instructors and read their personal biographies. This information should be available on the program website. Be certain to note how each program has the potential to enhance your artwork. Identify anything about your art or your personal character that may be an asset to these programs.

Open your statement of purpose with a compelling statement in three sentences that sums up your passion, your direction and your motivation for being an artist.

Explain your artwork and your experience as an artist in one to two paragraphs. Discuss any important courses taken in college that helped to shape your art, including any professors who influenced you.

 

Here’s a link with a couple hundred examples of blogs which focus on certain genres and fields relating to art and design. However, you’ll also be combining your research, with your own documentation of your work.

 

 

 

Using photoshop for stop motion

First take all of your images and place them into one folder.

Then open Bridge

Screen Shot 2014-12-08 at 10.56.57

Now your images will become layers in photoshop

Screen Shot 2014-12-08 at 10.59.29

Now open the animation window in Photoshop ( newer versions it’s called timeline )

Screen Shot 2014-12-08 at 11.00.08

You will see a timeline appear at the bottom of the page.

Click the arrow at the far right side and select “Make frames from layers”

Screen Shot 2014-12-08 at 11.01.31

You can select all of your frames and control the speed of each one clicking the little black arrow in the bottom right corner.

Screen Shot 2014-12-08 at 11.03.42

Once you’ve got the frame rate at where you want it to be. You can render your video.

Screen Shot 2014-12-08 at 11.05.21

If you want to make it into a gif you can chose “save for web devices”

Screen Shot 2014-12-08 at 11.06.31

Line Variation and Inking

Today we will be inking our characters that we created sketches from last week.

line_variation

 

These can be created by simply choosing a brush which is pressure sensitive (if using a tablet) or has a tapered end.

line_variation2

 

 

With inking we want to emphasise the weight of the object by the thickness of the line

line_weight

 

Things that control the thickness of a line can include

Pressure

Speed

Direction

softness of the medium (softer pencils display a variation in line easily)

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 15.14.44

 

For your project you must ink your sketches and vary the line based upon these principles.

Typically the outside lines are generally thicker than the inside “detail lines”