Line Variation and Inking

Today we will be inking our characters that we created sketches from last week.

line_variation

 

These can be created by simply choosing a brush which is pressure sensitive (if using a tablet) or has a tapered end.

line_variation2

 

 

With inking we want to emphasise the weight of the object by the thickness of the line

line_weight

 

Things that control the thickness of a line can include

Pressure

Speed

Direction

softness of the medium (softer pencils display a variation in line easily)

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 15.14.44

 

For your project you must ink your sketches and vary the line based upon these principles.

Typically the outside lines are generally thicker than the inside “detail lines”

 

 

Assignment 2: Armatures for Animation

Download the assignment here

 

THE TASK:
For this assignment you will be creating three rigs of a character which could be further developed and used in popular animation programs such as Toon Boom, Anime Studio, or Flash. These will be drawn with conventional materials such as pencil and paper and further cleaned up and prepared for the animation process in a digital format. The digital version of these rigs can vary depending on how you desire your finished animation to look. You can either retain the texture and feel of traditional materials, or redraw the characters in Photoshop or Illustrator. You will be creating a frontal view (arms out) and two side views (one facing left and one facing right).

Week 1. Introduction to Loomis’ forms and method of how to construct a character using simple shapes.

Homework: Collect reference material for the use of creating your character.
Week 2. Sketching and problem solving, working in colored pencil or erasable media (pencil).

Week 3. Finalization and inking. Can be done traditionally with pen and ink, or your drawings may be scanned and completed in Photoshop or Illustrator.

Required Work and Format

You must submit a disc containing all of your drawings. At least one page of the Loomis shapes. 1 page of your preliminary sketches. And the finalized character in frontal view, and two side views. These can be submitted as Jpegs or all together as 1 PDF.

 

basic armatures

 

One major consideration in the creation of these armatures is to determine how the weight will be carried and expressed in your rig.

loomis_weight

Considerations of how weight effects movement should also be considered. A good rig will look as if it is moving effortlessly, not that it is being forced to move. This is a difficult thing to explain with words, but we’ve all seen the robotic looking animations that come off as being too stiff. This is generally due to not showing how weight, and balance effect the rig. The balance of a character can often be shown in the preliminary stages of the drawing with the creation of simple shaped based versions of your characters.

cartoon_shapes

 

 

 

 

 

toon_boom_rig

 

 

Writing a statement of intent for artistic practices

hands

Meetings with George and Jeremiah about your Statement of Intents.

During these meetings you should show your progress into the creation of the SOI. The statement of intent will be a 250 word pdf written about your intentions as well as references in the creation of your work throughout the semester. This is a flexible document, meaning you can change directions as they arise.

If you have any questions about the requirements of the statement of Intent you can consult the student handbook, or look at this excerpt from the course descriptor.

Written Assignment (Statement of Intent) (K2, T2,T4)

“The statement of intent: a reflective, concise piece of writing which details, evaluates, and contextualises each student’s self- authored project designed to identify and build upon personal aptitudes and strengths and articulate ideas clearly. An essential and transferable skill required for career progression as an artist practitioner.

Critieria:

The ability to independently apply a sophisticated range of research methods using appropriate specialist sources and discursive contexts is articulated in the Statement of Intent.
The ability to independently plan, manage, review and evaluate key aspects of own learning and development is articulated.
The ability to propose a selectively appropriate choice of methodologies, strategies and technologies for the production of high quality artifacts.

In addition to the statement of Intent you should remember that at the end of the semester you will be creating a studio presentation. 

Studio Presentation (C2, P2)

The ability to independently evaluate and apply theoretical knowledge and concepts in visual and curatorial contexts is materially evidenced.
Advanced production expertise in the use of appropriate materials, applied strategies, processes and media for the successful development and depiction of ideas is materially evidenced

That research ethics and project consent are embedded in the process of production and display of textual and visual artefacts 

Statement’s of intent are often used as one of the most important documents required for applying for Masters programs. These programs tend to ask the following questions.

Reflect on what drives you as an artist. Whether you are driven by the beauty of nature or rebelling against government oppression, search your past for any defining moments that may have shaped your perspective. Write these memories down on scrap paper as a reference source while writing your statement of purpose.

Research the artistic benefits of study in each studio art program you wish to apply to. Review the artwork of the instructors and read their personal biographies. This information should be available on the program website. Be certain to note how each program has the potential to enhance your artwork. Identify anything about your art or your personal character that may be an asset to these programs.

Open your statement of purpose with a compelling statement in three sentences that sums up your passion, your direction and your motivation for being an artist.

Explain your artwork and your experience as an artist in one to two paragraphs. Discuss any important courses taken in college that helped to shape your art, including any professors who influenced you.

via

Self Directed Project Examples

Semion’s research involving light painting and digital manipulation.

Lukas investigates simple hand made textures to be used for 3d. PDF

hand_drawn_3d_texture hand_drawn_textured_3d_cube

Andri uses light and video to make drawings.

And some of Semion’s final pieces.

 

IMG_5027

reflections2

 

Vanda Used Illustrator to draw various shapes which she infused into video compositions. Therefore drawing both with the video as well as the masks which was creating.

Shapes from Vanda Knapkova on Vimeo.

Roman used a series of digital manipulated portraits of himself to give the effect of aging and death of himself.

 

 

Tamara used photographs of people as her drawing media and created an entire alphabet based upon the manipulations of these forms.

 

human_figure_alphabet

Liaman used a projector flashing different colored lights to animate patterns she drew.

Radovan used a motor, some wood, and LEDs to make a spinning light drawing sculpture. See full process here.

Screen-shot-2014-02-10-at-4.07.47-PM Screen-shot-2014-02-10-at-4.09.28-PM Screen-shot-2014-02-10-at-4.10.10-PM

Ayna makes a series of paintings you can view the PDF HERE.

 

What is Fine Art Experimental Media?

The Fine Art Experimental Media program is a three year program which delves into the intersections between new technologies and contemporary art. While you will learn various programs that could prepare you for other professions, the goal of the program is to foster creative individuals who can solve problems and create new and innovative works of art relating to space, interactivity, time, and digital media. The following courses compose the first two years of study in the program, before a final year in the BA which is focused primarily on studio work, conceptual development through critical writing, and an exhibition module.

Courses during the first two years.

Animation Techniques for Interactivity, 2D 3D and Time-Based Digital Applications, Drawing Techniques and Processes, Computer Interface Design Principles, New Technologies in Interactive Media, Interactive Media Design and Prototyping, Interactive Media Web Authoring, Contextual & Cultural Referencing, Audio-Visual Techniques, Professional Practice, Digital Video Post Production & Editing, Sound Production and Editing, Idea Generation and Development, Website Creation and Management, Critical Study, Project Design; Implementation and Evaluation.

Courses for Final BA Year.

Reflective Case Study, Visual Production, Final Exhibition.

So what’s the difference betwen Commercial Art, and Fine Art?

If you are unfamiliar with these courses and concepts, and how they relate to contemporary art making, then you should look at some prominent artists working in the field to gain a better understanding of what types of projects generally encompass this field of study.  While there have been many debates about what generally constitutes commercial work, and what is Fine Art the statement can be made that commercial work is generally created for a client, and while someone hired to make a commercial certainly has their own creative vision their end goal is to showcase a company or business. The FAEM program is not focused on creating work for companies, clients or businesses. It’s a Fine Art program.

What Software and Computer Languages which will be studied?

Aftereffects, Premiere, Flash, VVVV, Pure Data, Reaper, Unity, Resolume, 3dsMax, HTML, Javascript, C Sharp, and you will also be using controllers such as Arduino which need to be programmed as well as Kinect. On top of that there is a focus on writing and critical theory, animation, and drawing techniques with new media.

Examples of Experimental Media.

Projection mapping has been around for about 50 years, the goal is to turn almost any surface into a dynamic video display. Software such as Aftereffects, Resolume, and Quartz are used to warp and mask the projected image to make it fit perfectly on irregularly shaped screens. The following video is a good example of what the limits of the medium are, and how the aesthetic of the medium can be used.

THE AETHER PROJECT from Refik Anadol on Vimeo.

 

Pedro Reyes is a sculptor who works with guns which have been disassembled and then he creates large mechanized instruments from them.  In this piece we can see that he revisioned these objects which were once deadly and turned them into something which creates sound. Thereby intersecting the boundaries between sound art, kinetic sculpture, and collage.

Jodi.org 1993

Jodi.org took the approach that a website could itself, and that the internet could be seen as a medium much like paint or charcoal. The project was created by two European artists whose goal was to take apart the typical language of the internet, and replace it with an interpretation of data. The site displays remixed versions of found images and html scripts in a way similar to how the dadaists cut up poetry. The project displayed principles inherit in a lot of New Media art which is the fact that it took advantage of emerging technolgies as a vehicle to create new art. For this reason, today when we have different new technologies to play with, they are often the focus of how to create new works of art and devices are often hacked or reconfigured to fit the needs of the artist. The idea that these objects can exist purely as data is one which is common, and often exploited.

jodi_org

 

Artists also employ a strong element of interactivity into these works as well as we can see in the work of Muti Randolph who created a giant interactive sculpture which would respond and interact with the movements of those who were walking through it. It is common for these artists to employ the use of arduino (a single board controller which  intended to make the application of interactive objects or environments more accessible) as well as more familiar items such as Kinect which allows a computer to track someone’s movements and track them.

But artists using New Media is not something only synonymous with the digital age. One can  look at the work by Swiss Sculptor Jean Tinguley who is best known for his self destructing sculptures.  Many times an emphasis is put on temporary work and the genre blends aspects of performance as well as traditional artistic practices such as sculpture or painting.

 

Because of the fact that often times the work created was temporary, often the pieces would be videotaped as documentation of the work itself. At the same time the advent of video technology lead to artists also using and exploiting the medium to create works of art. Nam Jun Paik is one of the most well known examples of an artist to explore the incorporation of video into his work. Paik blended elements of sculpture, happenings, video footage, and sound into his installations.

Artists such as Eduardo Kac pushed the boundaries of what it meant to be a biological entity with the creation of his glowing rabbit. This is still a developing field referred to as Transgenetic Art.  By extracting a protein found in a certain type of jellyfish, he infused this protein into the DNA of a rabbit and created this living sculpture which would glow when blue light was shined upon it.

glowing_rabbit

The creation of this transgenetic art caused the rabbit to be held inside a lab because of fears that it would try to reproduce if it escaped.  Subsequently there was a campaign to Free Alba (The name of the rabbit) which created some public debate about the morality of the project. This debate, according to Kac, also became part of the artwork itself and made it a living public sculpture.

Bas Jan Ader

 

As you can see, the materials and concepts present in a variety of pieces can vary greatly, however they are all rooted firmly in the history of art and thinking which developed during the 20th century. This timeline can give you a glimpse into the wide variety of influences both art, philosophy, and technological advancements had with one another. [ Click to Enlarge ]

 

20th_Century_Timeline_Art

 

It is important to note that the Fine Art Experimental Media program is not one which is directly geared towards the creation of commercial work, but rather immersive installations which fit into a Fine Art context.  This piece by Bill Viola incorporates a variety of media and techniques, including sculpture, video, and sound.

Viola is primarily known for innovative work working with Videos which encompass entire rooms which exhibit an overpowering quality to them. His subjects tend to revolve around issues regarding life, death, and consciousness.

In this sound installation in a forest by Janet Cardif she transforms a natural enviroment into a performance space.

In this piece by Stelarc, we can see that the body itself can be a living sculpture which can be manipulated and used to incorporate elements of technology, dance, performance, robotics, 3d modeling and sculpture.

As you can hopefully see by now, the thrust of the program is not on making car commercials, or animations. All of the programs you learn will simply be used as tools in the creation of art. If you are still uncertain the best possible way to decide your pathway would be to attend either the HND final show, or the BA final show, the visiting artist lecture series, or any of the other events which the program puts on.

 

 

Objects in Motion PES

Objects in Motion
Class

Personal Experimental Studies
Semester 1304
Lecturer : Jeremiah Palecek and Krystof Kriz
Start:
18.11.2013
Due Date:
20.12.2013
Internally
Verified by
IV Date
Pass Criteria
1.
Pass Criteria Covered
P1 explore materials, processes
and techniques safely
P2: Record Experimental outcomes
Students should show they can use and explore their materials
and associated processes safely andwith care. They should
recognise and apply relevant health and safety guidelines, and
experiment with materials, techniques and processes to generate
a range of tests, samples, roughs and practical work..
students should demonstrate the ability to record their
experimentation in a clear and methodical
manner. They will record findings on a regular basis and include
all relevant technical information. Recording
can take many forms as appropriate to the process and the
individual learning needs. There will be evidence
of their involvement with the processes. Technical language and
terminology will be used correctly.
1.
Grading
Descriptors
Grading Criteria
Summary of Tasks

THE TASK:
Students will have to choose at least two different objects from which they will be making a sculpture, for instance, this could be
something like matches and bottle caps. They will also be assigned an emotion which they must illustrate. Using these two objects
they will make sketches of how to construct 2 characters which will interact in a short stop motion film. A storyboard will also
accompany these sketches. Students will be allowed to use materials to connect their objects together such as wire, string,
chickenwire fence, or rope. [p1] Once the character/sculptures are finished the students will then create an animation which
incorporates both of their objects into a narrative. Once all the footage is shot we will finalize the animations and add sound in
photoshop and premiere. [p2] Sketchbook (Can Continue using MEAD Sketchbook if you wish)
Experimentation will be carried out during class time. And we will be engaging in a series of
Prague College
1.
Required Work and Format
You must submit a cd to reception with your scans of all relevant sketchbook pages during the last
3 weeks. The more documentation you have of your experimentation, and research the better. Your
submission must contain every media studied during class. Failure to include documentation of each
medium will result in a failing grade.

 

 

Examples of Stop Motion Animation

EAGER by Allison Schulnik from garaco taco on Vimeo.

 

As you can see in all of these stop motions, the animator creating them took materials which had qualities of something quite different than what is portrayed. So slabs of meat become two lovers. Paper becomes water dripping. And dollar bills become herbs and spices.

For next class you must bring your materials with which you will be working! That means if you are going to be using bottle caps, matches, and wire then you must bring all of these materials to class to begin construction of your armature. This is a very in depth project which we don’t have a lot of time for so it is important to stay on track as it is very easy to fall behind. You may use any program to animate your objects. The simplest being Flash, or Photoshop or if you want to download a program like Dragon Frame then feel free as well. The important thing to remember is that your armatures must be solid enough to be moved into various positions.

MÖBIUS from ENESS on Vimeo.

Building Armatures

You’re going to have to find a way to get your objects to stick together. This can be done with a variety of materials from using a glue gun, to using glue, to tying pieces together with wire, to using hinges and joints to create functioning arms and legs.

Building of these armatures can obviously get very complex for more extensive projects.

GLUE

So, what do you need for next class?

1. Your two Objects which will form the majority of your characters which you will be creating.

2. Something to hold these objects together (Glue, wire, gluestick, etc.)

3. Choose one emotion which will be demonstrated by your animation. (see the list below)

4. Storyboards of your stop motion must also be finished as soon as possible ( but we understand it will take some time to construct your characters first)

 

STUDENT EXAMPLES

 

List of Emotions

abandoned

acceptance

adoration

affection

Aggravated

agitated

agressive

alert

amazed

ambitious

amused

anger, anger2

animosity

annoyed

anticipation, anticipation2

anxiousness

appreciative

apprehensive

ardent

aroused

ashamed

astonished

attraction (sexual)

attraction (intellectual)

attraction (spiritual)

awed

betrayed

bewildered

bitter

bliss

blue

boastful

bored

breathless

bubbly

calamitous

calm

camaraderie

cautious

cheerful

cocky

cold

collected

comfortable

compassionate

concerned

confident

confused

contempt

content

courageous

cowardly

crafty

cranky

crazy

cruelty

crummy

crushed

curious

cynic

dark

dejected

delighted

delirious

denial

depression

desire poem

despair

determined

devastated

disappointed

discouraged

disgust

disheartened

dismal

dispirited

distracted

distressed

dopey

down

dreadful

dreary

eager

ecstatic

embarrassed

emotional-detest

empathic

emptiness

enchanted

enigmatic

enlightened

enraged

enthralled

enthusiastic

envy

euphoric

excited

exhausted

expectation

exuberance

fascinated

fear

flabbergasted

fight-or-flight

foolish

frazzled

frustrated

fulfillment

furious

gay

giddy

gleeful

gloomy

goofy

grateful

gratified

greedy

Gray Because a Broken Heart

grief poem

grouchy

grudging

guilty

happy happy2

hate

heartbroken

homesick

hopeful

hopeless

horrified

hostile

humiliated

humored

hurt

hyper

hysterical

indignation

infatuation

infuriated

inner peace

innocent

insanity

insecure

insecure

inspired poem

interest

intimidated

invidious

irate

irritability

irritated

jaded

jealousy

joy

jubilant

kind

lazy

left out

liberated

lively

loathsome

lonely

longing

love

lovesick

loyal

lust

mad

mean

melancholic

mellow

mercy

merry

mildness

miserable

morbid

mourning

needed

needy

nervous

obscene

obsessed

offended

optimistic

outraged

overwhelmed

pacified

pain

panicky

paranoia

passion

pathetic

peaceful

perturbation

pessimistic

petrified

pity

playful

pleased

pleasure

possessive

pride

provoked

proud

puzzled

rage

regretful

relief

remorse

resentment

resignation

resolved

re

sadness

satisfied

scared

Schadenfreude
song about Schadenfreude

scorn

selfish

sensual

sensitive

sexy

shame

sheepish

shocked

shy

sincerity

solemn

somber

sorrow

sorry

spirited

stressed stressed2

strong

submissive

superior

surprised

sweet

sympathetic

temperamental

tense

terrified

threatened

thrilled

tired

tranquil

troubled

trust

tormented

uncertainty

uneasiness

unhappy

upset

vengeful

vicious

warm

weary

worn-out

worried

worthless

wrathful

yearning

zesty

Generative Art and Chance for Visual Production

Sol LeWitt wrote that “the serial artist does not attempt to produce a beautiful or mysterious object but functions merely as a clerk cataloguing the results of his premise.”

sol_le_witt_grid

Generative art refers to art that in whole or in part has been created with the use of an autonomous system. An autonomous system in this context is generally one that is non-human and can independently determine features of an artwork that would otherwise require decisions made directly by the artist. (Thanks Wikipedia)

Generative systems can manifest themselves in generally two ways.

The system can be an extension of an artists intent, and original idea, and the work should reflect these intentions. In this situation the artist still possesses some control and works with elements which are generated by chance. In the following piece by Ellsworth Kelley he used several small compositions which were based upon cutting up multiple sheets of paper and matching them together by tossing them into the air, cutting the edges square, and then placing the smaller compositions into a larger grid. In this piece Kelley obviously determined the colors which were to be used however he let the compositions make themselves by chance. One should also note, that this piece worked out quite well, and that is probably why it is better known than other experiments that never saw the light of day.

Kelly-Meschers

In a following piece Kelley was noted to have said that he wished to work with more color after seeing an Ad Rheinhart exhibition. His pilgrimage into color was marked by the creation of a series of collages called the Spectrum Colors Arranged by Chance I to VIII. In this piece he created a grid, and then randomly assigned each square in the grid a color by mixing up a bunch of numbers in a hat and pulling them out randomly. Of course, there were still limits in place such as how many numbers can be used and restrictions.

Spectrum Colors Arranged by Chance I to VIII

William Burroughs talks about using a similar technique to generate poetry. Created by the Dadaists, popularized by Burroughs. The technique still lives on and has also been used by Thom Yorke (he’s in this band called Radiohead) and Kurt Cobain.

iching_coins

Divination techniques of the I Ching were used by John Cage to create paintings. Read more about them here.

cage_dereau23_new

He also used them to make musical compositions which Jorge could undoubtedly tell you more about.

Generative works can also be made from code, and therefore some argue that these sorts of works that the artist steps back even further and the system itself should take on the role of the creator.

“works where an unpredictable progressive virus operates on a degradation/transformation of an image. Using a C++ framework, Joseph Nechvatal and his programmer/collaborator Stephane Sikora have brought Nechvatal’s early computer virus project into the realm of artificial life (A-Life) (i.e. into a synthetic system that exhibits behaviors characteristic of natural living systems). With Computer Virus Project 2.0, elements of artificial life have been introduced in that viruses are modeled to be autonomous agents living in/off the image. The project simulates a population of active viruses functioning as an analogy of a viral biological system. Here the host of the virus are the digital files on which the computer-robotic assisted paintings in this show are based. Among the different techniques used here are models that result from embodied artificial intelligence and the paradigm of genetic programming.”

So what’s in common with all of these pieces? For starters each element was chosen by a human, and it would be difficult to argue that all generative art is not a byproduct of human decision. Kelley chose colors, Burroughs cut up newspapers, and Cage assigned notes on a piano (ok ok. and colors too…He was pretty good!..anyway). But the point is that all of these had a starting point and that was working with a specific medium and process. And many times it is important to note that they fit what many would assume is a chaotic process of generated components of their work and put it into a certain framework. Such as a grid, or a series (yep. That’s why Sol Lewitt is also called a Serial Artist). If you think your stuff looks like crap then put it in a square.

Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 12.20.12 PM

You were all told to bring two mediums to class, one traditional, and one which is digital. You will be creating a system of making art which is based upon some chance operation to combine your two media. That means the final piece should exhibit both the qualities of the traditional media as well as the digital media. If you are stuck on how to create chance operations then first think about what are the components inherit in both of your mediums and how you can assign these components into a generative system. Paint has color, thickness, wetness, darkness, speed, application, texture, forms. Jpegs are made of code, colors, darknesses, computer screens, projected light, or turkeys.

How have people done chance operations? Roll some dice. Point to a word in a book at random. Throw stuff at the wall. Break stuff. roll some dice which determines which rock you should throw at a glass full of words and then make 10 images based off of the first ten words you pick up and then pour wax all over the images. Remember you can also do loads of chance operations using the internet or your computer. Use google to generate random words based upon random searches. Use Youtube to generate random screen grabs etc. Create some artificial intelligence which not only creates digital work but also spams leading art galleries emails with the images. But remember your final piece should combine a traditional medium with your digital medium.

nechvatal

“Hey what are some traditional mediums!”

Cement, Glass, Metal, Stone, Brick, Wood, Chalk, Charcoal, Crayon, Graphite, Marker, Pastel, Pen and ink, Pencil, Sand, Watercolour, Oils, Acylics, Inks, Dyes, Glues, film, wooden instruments,

“Ok cool. So what are some new mediums?”

Well, digital media is generally referred to as stuff that needs electricity to work. Like Graphic art software for illustration and animation, 3D computer graphics for sculpture and 3D animation, Digital photography and digital video for the capturing of photographs and footagecontrolling devices (touch screens or midi keyboards and kinnects) to bridge the gap between traditional techniques and digital painting, projections, screens, and programming.

“Well some of those are old too”

I know, but this conversation could go on for hours…. So stop proscratinating and start making art!

secret-life-of-sueprheroes-2-0411-970x399

Some challenges to consider.

Try to create the most conceptually potent work, with the least amount of effort. It is important to remember that there is no longer a division between how “good” something is, and the amount of labor required to make it. Duchamp signaled this when he created his fountain.

There is a difference between art and craft (or technique).

Postmodern art is not something you “get”. Ever. It isn’t a puzzle to solve. It’s an investigation that may not have any answers, or may not care about answers.

Artwork generally today is not about illustrating anything, and it is less insistent that the viewer come to work with any sort of predefined knowledge.

Media and Themes

Every student will choose the medium which they will have to investigate.  These mediums could be anything from  traditional mediums such as paint to more contemporary mediums such as sound or video. You must also research the context in which the work of art was created, and reinterpret the theme/spirit of that work with a new medium. Every student must develop a concept or theme based on an artwork which they will reinterpret with their media.

You will have to create a way of documenting your experiments as well as your research. This can be done in a digital format (such as a blog or even just a Google Doc) or an old fashioned sketchbook.

Your sketchbooks(Blogs) will be a place to document your investigations into various techniques.

art-gcse-sketchbook

sketchittt

They can be a place to experiment with developing a style.

sketch_amose

They can be a place to research artists

sketchit

sketchitt

And a place to construct ideas

sketchitttt

 

davinci

 

Possible themes and media which you can investigate include

Video Sculptures with Projections

Jakub Nepras

Painting

gerhard-richter

Gerhard Richter

Sculpture

Theo-Mercier

Theo Mercier

Graphic Design of Posters

poema

Studio Airport

Illustration

illustration_tumblr

 

Jonny Isaacson

Photography

photo

 

Laura Williams

Animation

 

The Deep End from Jake Fried on Vimeo.

Jake Fried

Stop Motion

PES

Logos

logos

Sound

Iannis Xanakis