Tag: assignment

Line Variation and Inking

Today we will be inking our characters that we created sketches from last week.

line_variation

 

These can be created by simply choosing a brush which is pressure sensitive (if using a tablet) or has a tapered end.

line_variation2

 

 

With inking we want to emphasise the weight of the object by the thickness of the line

line_weight

 

Things that control the thickness of a line can include

Pressure

Speed

Direction

softness of the medium (softer pencils display a variation in line easily)

Screen Shot 2014-11-10 at 15.14.44

 

For your project you must ink your sketches and vary the line based upon these principles.

Typically the outside lines are generally thicker than the inside “detail lines”

 

 

Objects in Motion PES

Objects in Motion
Class

Personal Experimental Studies
Semester 1304
Lecturer : Jeremiah Palecek and Krystof Kriz
Start:
18.11.2013
Due Date:
20.12.2013
Internally
Verified by
IV Date
Pass Criteria
1.
Pass Criteria Covered
P1 explore materials, processes
and techniques safely
P2: Record Experimental outcomes
Students should show they can use and explore their materials
and associated processes safely andwith care. They should
recognise and apply relevant health and safety guidelines, and
experiment with materials, techniques and processes to generate
a range of tests, samples, roughs and practical work..
students should demonstrate the ability to record their
experimentation in a clear and methodical
manner. They will record findings on a regular basis and include
all relevant technical information. Recording
can take many forms as appropriate to the process and the
individual learning needs. There will be evidence
of their involvement with the processes. Technical language and
terminology will be used correctly.
1.
Grading
Descriptors
Grading Criteria
Summary of Tasks

THE TASK:
Students will have to choose at least two different objects from which they will be making a sculpture, for instance, this could be
something like matches and bottle caps. They will also be assigned an emotion which they must illustrate. Using these two objects
they will make sketches of how to construct 2 characters which will interact in a short stop motion film. A storyboard will also
accompany these sketches. Students will be allowed to use materials to connect their objects together such as wire, string,
chickenwire fence, or rope. [p1] Once the character/sculptures are finished the students will then create an animation which
incorporates both of their objects into a narrative. Once all the footage is shot we will finalize the animations and add sound in
photoshop and premiere. [p2] Sketchbook (Can Continue using MEAD Sketchbook if you wish)
Experimentation will be carried out during class time. And we will be engaging in a series of
Prague College
1.
Required Work and Format
You must submit a cd to reception with your scans of all relevant sketchbook pages during the last
3 weeks. The more documentation you have of your experimentation, and research the better. Your
submission must contain every media studied during class. Failure to include documentation of each
medium will result in a failing grade.

 

 

Examples of Stop Motion Animation

EAGER by Allison Schulnik from garaco taco on Vimeo.

 

As you can see in all of these stop motions, the animator creating them took materials which had qualities of something quite different than what is portrayed. So slabs of meat become two lovers. Paper becomes water dripping. And dollar bills become herbs and spices.

For next class you must bring your materials with which you will be working! That means if you are going to be using bottle caps, matches, and wire then you must bring all of these materials to class to begin construction of your armature. This is a very in depth project which we don’t have a lot of time for so it is important to stay on track as it is very easy to fall behind. You may use any program to animate your objects. The simplest being Flash, or Photoshop or if you want to download a program like Dragon Frame then feel free as well. The important thing to remember is that your armatures must be solid enough to be moved into various positions.

MÖBIUS from ENESS on Vimeo.

Building Armatures

You’re going to have to find a way to get your objects to stick together. This can be done with a variety of materials from using a glue gun, to using glue, to tying pieces together with wire, to using hinges and joints to create functioning arms and legs.

Building of these armatures can obviously get very complex for more extensive projects.

GLUE

So, what do you need for next class?

1. Your two Objects which will form the majority of your characters which you will be creating.

2. Something to hold these objects together (Glue, wire, gluestick, etc.)

3. Choose one emotion which will be demonstrated by your animation. (see the list below)

4. Storyboards of your stop motion must also be finished as soon as possible ( but we understand it will take some time to construct your characters first)

 

STUDENT EXAMPLES

 

List of Emotions

abandoned

acceptance

adoration

affection

Aggravated

agitated

agressive

alert

amazed

ambitious

amused

anger, anger2

animosity

annoyed

anticipation, anticipation2

anxiousness

appreciative

apprehensive

ardent

aroused

ashamed

astonished

attraction (sexual)

attraction (intellectual)

attraction (spiritual)

awed

betrayed

bewildered

bitter

bliss

blue

boastful

bored

breathless

bubbly

calamitous

calm

camaraderie

cautious

cheerful

cocky

cold

collected

comfortable

compassionate

concerned

confident

confused

contempt

content

courageous

cowardly

crafty

cranky

crazy

cruelty

crummy

crushed

curious

cynic

dark

dejected

delighted

delirious

denial

depression

desire poem

despair

determined

devastated

disappointed

discouraged

disgust

disheartened

dismal

dispirited

distracted

distressed

dopey

down

dreadful

dreary

eager

ecstatic

embarrassed

emotional-detest

empathic

emptiness

enchanted

enigmatic

enlightened

enraged

enthralled

enthusiastic

envy

euphoric

excited

exhausted

expectation

exuberance

fascinated

fear

flabbergasted

fight-or-flight

foolish

frazzled

frustrated

fulfillment

furious

gay

giddy

gleeful

gloomy

goofy

grateful

gratified

greedy

Gray Because a Broken Heart

grief poem

grouchy

grudging

guilty

happy happy2

hate

heartbroken

homesick

hopeful

hopeless

horrified

hostile

humiliated

humored

hurt

hyper

hysterical

indignation

infatuation

infuriated

inner peace

innocent

insanity

insecure

insecure

inspired poem

interest

intimidated

invidious

irate

irritability

irritated

jaded

jealousy

joy

jubilant

kind

lazy

left out

liberated

lively

loathsome

lonely

longing

love

lovesick

loyal

lust

mad

mean

melancholic

mellow

mercy

merry

mildness

miserable

morbid

mourning

needed

needy

nervous

obscene

obsessed

offended

optimistic

outraged

overwhelmed

pacified

pain

panicky

paranoia

passion

pathetic

peaceful

perturbation

pessimistic

petrified

pity

playful

pleased

pleasure

possessive

pride

provoked

proud

puzzled

rage

regretful

relief

remorse

resentment

resignation

resolved

re

sadness

satisfied

scared

Schadenfreude
song about Schadenfreude

scorn

selfish

sensual

sensitive

sexy

shame

sheepish

shocked

shy

sincerity

solemn

somber

sorrow

sorry

spirited

stressed stressed2

strong

submissive

superior

surprised

sweet

sympathetic

temperamental

tense

terrified

threatened

thrilled

tired

tranquil

troubled

trust

tormented

uncertainty

uneasiness

unhappy

upset

vengeful

vicious

warm

weary

worn-out

worried

worthless

wrathful

yearning

zesty

Personal Experimental Studies: Foundation : Storyboarding for Animation

1st Class: Introductions to the course. Expectations, and intro to mindmapping and sketching.

What’s a mindmap? A mindmap is a brainstorming technique which allows you to quickly generate words associated with a certain topic.

We will be doing mindmaps next class based upon your emotion, as well as the medium which you have been assigned.

 

Click on image to download Mindmap Template for a4 sized paper.

Storyboarding for Animation

2nd Class:

Today you will be  you will all be assigned the materials with which you will be working.

For this assigment you will be creating simple animations. Or loops which will combine the use of various media.

Each student will be assigned a traditional medium (Such as paint, ink, charcoal, clay, or photography). The student must then use the medium which they have been assigned in order to create a short sequential animation.

For example. If your medium which was assigned to you was Ink, and your emotion which was assigned to you was anger. Then you will have to make a short animation with ink which demonstrates anger.

Once all of the emotions and mediums have been assigned you will have the option to set up a blog for your research. If you would like help doing this then let me know and I will take you through the steps. If you have a Gmail account I would suggest just setting up a blogger account and using that as a place to compile your research.

Here’s a video of how to set up a blog in blogger.

 

 

After research on the medium has been finished we will begin to storyboard your plans for the animated shorts (Maximum of 10 seconds long). I will work individually with each student to help finalize these storyboards.

Storyboards are an important part of many different disciplines. Today’s lesson will involve an introduction to storyboarding, as well as give you time to work on your sequential animation assignment for Animation Techniques. Storyboarding Your Idea The first thing I want you to do before you begin drawing is to take time to evaluate your story and start to imagine which different shots you will be utilizing. Get a clear picture of what you want each shot is in your head before you start storyboarding it. Once you’ve got a mental shot list, you can start to draw each frame. Make sure that the frames of your storyboard match the size of the frame for the aspect ratio which you will be using in the production of your short sequential animation. Questions??? What’s an aspect ratio? An aspect ratio simply refers to the size of the frame which a film or video is created in. Think widescreen vs television.

What’s a shot list? A shot list is just a list of shots for a project. It would be a good idea to write down your shot list before storyboarding.  For this project you won’t need to create such an extensive shot list but it’s a good habit to start thinking about. Otherwise since you are working on such a short animation you can write your sound effects, music, camera angles, camera movement all on your storyboard.

As you plan your shot list, here are some questions to consider. What’s the setting? How many people are in the shot? Are there certain items which the characters need in the shot? Consider if you want it to be a close-up, wide-shot, establishing shot, or whatever type of shot you need. What’s the angle of the camera? Looking up? Wide? Low? Is stuff moving, if so, in what direction? What’s your lighting going to be like, and in which directions do you want your shadows to fall? Use the shot list as a guide. You don’t have to stick to it 100%, so as you storyboard don’t be afraid to tweak certain elements if you feel a change is justified. Choose a style of storyboard you wish to use. Here are some free examples which you can print out.
Storyboard 1 Storyboard 2
There’s a lot more to choose from. Just go to google and search for “storyboard templates” in images. Once you’ve got all of these preparations made you can then begin drawing. There’s no right way to draw a storyboard, in the end it should serve you, or others working on a project to understand how to shoot something. They can be very detailed, such as this one which made by Shane Acker for Tim Burton’s film “9”.

Or they could be very simple.

All in all the most important thing to remember is that storyboards are a tool which will be used by yourself in this project, however in the future you may have to be working with a group of people who need to take directions while you’re not around. This is where a good storyboard artist comes in handy, because he is essentially choosing many elements which could be very important to the overall feel of the film. Here’s a brief video tutorial from Sherm Cohen who is a storyboard artist at Disney if you’re still looking for inspiration and guidance.

Drawing Class Lesson 9: Color Theory

Introduction of Assignment 3:

What is the correct color wheel for painting? It has been hotly debated for over a century, and everyone seems to have an opinion about what the “real” primary colors are. In the following post I hope to educate you about some of the theories about just which primary colors are the best to be used for painting, and why. Of course I also offer some of my own personal opinion based upon my own studies of color as well as my experience as someone who loves painting in oils.

The first problem we run into when looking at the various color wheels which can be used for painting involves something called Tertiary Colors. Tertiary colors are created when one mixes a primary color (Red, Yellow, Blue) with one secondary color (orange, violet, green). Generally these are the colors located next to them on the color wheel.

They often have specific names which can get quite exotic such as Sea Green, or Azure. This is because often designers want to come up with a cool name for a color so they can market it better. For various reasons painters have been taught and told to use the RYB color wheel. A few reasons include the fact that artist materials which are available now used to have toxic compounds in them. Now with the advent of dyes it is easier to synthesize a color such as cyan. The one thing to remember however when using these colors is that dyes will fade with age, while real pigments (such as cadmium) have already stood the test of time for centuries.

First we will be focusing on the Red/Yellow/Blue color wheel which is most often used by painters. In the color wheel above the Tertiary Colors shown are Yellow Green, Blue Green, Yellow Orange, Red Orange, Red Violet, Blue Violet, and Blue Green. This was widely believed to be standard colors to use for quite some time, and is still often used in Art Education up to this day.

An RYB color chart from George Field’s 1841 Chromatography; or, A treatise on colours and pigments: and of their powers in painting
Back in the 18th century the theories surrounding color theory were cemented in the idea that the RYB (Red/Yellow/Blue) was the way to go. These theories have since changed over the years, however the RYB color model is still often used in teaching painting, and color theory up to this day.

These theories were enhanced by 18th-century investigations of a variety of purely psychological color effects, in particular the contrast between “complementary” or opposing hues that are produced by color afterimages and in the contrasting shadows in colored light.

During the 18th century the theory of the RYB model was furthered by two great thinkers. They were Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, and Michel Eugene Chevreul. They were both transfixed by what is called the Psychological effects of color, and obsessed with how our eyes perceive color. One of the main things they observed was how complementary colors (that means they are opposite each other on the color wheel) created afterimages in our brains when they were “burned” into our eyes. They were also interested in why shadows in colored light would create contrasting shadows. You can download Goethe’s The Theory of Colors here as I’ve uploaded it to this site. It is in the creative commons so there it has no copyright and is in the Public Domain.

After Goethe and his treatise on color, scientists moved away from the RYB color wheel and shifted towards a color wheel which most everyone sees every day. This is the Red, Green, and Blue (RGB) model which still dominates a lot of media to this day (Hint: It’s how your TV works). To understand how this color wheel operates we need to go back to the previous lesson, and further examine how different lights makes different colors as opposed to how pigments (or physical mixtures of color) differ.

In the previous lessons we have talked about Additive and Subtractive colors. Forgive me if I wasn’t clear enough before, but these lessons are meant to be sequential, and therefore sometimes I will withhold information so you can absorb it at different rates.

To put it simply, Additive Color is created by adding color. How do we add color? Well, by using light. That’s why if you get up close to a TV set you will see tiny little bars of Red, Green, and Blue. Learning about additive color is particularly important for those who use a computer to create their imagery, as they are dealing with a medium that is essentially based upon the glow of a computer screen. Now, what happens when that person decides he wants to print out the image on his screen? The answer is that he will need to deal with another color wheel when the image is printed from a computer screen onto a piece of paper! This is because a piece of paper doesn’t glow, it’s reflecting light from a light bulb or the sun. As we discussed previously, an object doesn’t hold a certain color because it reflects it, it is a certain color because it absorbs all the other colors in the spectrum. Hence the term, subtractive color.

So we, as painters, aren’t painting with light, we’re painting with paint. Hence, we need to use a color wheel which is specific to our needs. Let’s take a look at the two different types of color wheels. Check out the first one below. This is a classical color wheel which utilizes Red, Yellow, and Blue as the primaries.

There’s some nice oranges and violets in there right? Oh? What’s that, you want them to be brighter and more vibrant? Well, then you can use the Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow color wheel below. CMYK is the color wheel which is utilized in printing, and has generally been regarded as the “true” set of primaries.

But there’s a few problems with this color wheel. Mainly, it doesn’t exist in nature (as in, natural pigments) as readily available as the colors which have been used for thousands of years. However if you want to oil paint with Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow then you can. But if you believe that oil paints will mix similarly to a printing machine then you’re fooling yourself. As you have probably already learned, different colors and different pigments have different strengths and weaknesses.

By this I mean every color has different properties. In the printing process CMYK(K stands for black) are often used in transparent glazes. For instance, in order to make red in in CMYK printing you first print a tiny little magenta dot, and then on top of that dot is a yellow which is semi transparent. That’s how you make red. Now with oil paint let’s say that you want to paint a giant red object. If you were painting by utilizing the CMYK printing model you’d have to first paint an entire layer magenta, wait three days, and then on top of that you would glaze a bit of yellow on top of it to get your red. So yes, it is possible to paint with CMYK, but the simple answer is that it would simply take FOREVER to finish a painting, because we’re not machines, and paint takes a long time to dry.

So what do we do as painters? Which color wheel should we use? I would suggest that you (that’s right, you) find a palette that you enjoy working with. Limit it to no more than 10 colors, and get used to it. It takes a long time to learn how to properly mix and see color so find a palette that you feel comfortable manipulating. I know for me I like to use Cadmium Red Medium, Cadmium Yellow Medium, Pthalo Blue, Pthalo Green, Alizarin Crimson, Yellow Ochre, Ultramarine Blue, Raw Umber, Permanent Violet Medium, and Titanium White. And that’s what I’ve used for numerous painting tutorials that I’ve done. It’s a hybrid of both CMYK as well as the Old RYB models. With RYB it can be difficult to make a nice brilliant violet as well as green. So what do you do? You buy them And if you want to try to paint with Cyan, Magenta, and Yellow then you can. These colors are generally referred to as Process Blue, Process Red, and Process Yellow. They’re dyes so they won’t last as long (meaning they’ll fade faster) as the classical pigments but they could be interesting to experiment with. For me? I’ll stick to Cadmiums, Ultramarine, Titanium, and Cobalt. There’s a reason why they’ve been around for thousands of years.