Tag: HND

Intro To FMP

What do artists do all day?

Making it in the little leagues of Graphic Design with Aaron Draplin

Overview of week 1

– Monday: General introduction to Final Major Project, assignment given and state whether you are a intending to do Experimental Media or Graphic Design. Jeremiah will introduce you to what is meant by an Statement of Intent.

– Tuesday: Instead of your 12.50 class you will be expected to go to the Visiting Artist & Lecturer Series. The artist’s name is Jesus Palomino and the location is Room 001 in Blanicka at 5pm which is after your first EMD class with Franco. Check the noticeboard for further details…

– Wednesday: Everyone must have at least 2 potential ideas ready to discuss for your Final Major Project, along with some initial research to help explain your ideas. Groups are then announced.

– Friday: Everyone will meet for further discussion of your ideas along with further research with Sean in relation to writing a formal Statement of Intent (SOI) One idea will be selected from the two. Groups are then announced.

This week Students will firstly be expected to suggest at least 2 potential ideas for a Final Major Project (FMP) on Wednesday during Sean’s session. They must then do some further initial research about both ideas to explain and justify their 2 concepts and have this ready for their class with Sean on Friday.

It is important to come up with ideas that have a strong concept or theme and a depth of thought so that a number of pieces or a very in-depth and involved single piece of work can be produced. Remember this piece of work is also ultimately about achieving merits and distinctions.

During your classes with either Sean or Jeremiah you should agree with your lecturer which of your 2 concepts will be the final version to work up into a proper SOI (statement of intent) and you should bring a first typed draft of this to your next class. You will also be expected to produce your own realistic working timeline of how you envisage your work progressing.

When you prepare your final SOI you must also create a planner for the whole semester. This must be submitted with your final SOI and its creation must be taken seriously

 

What’s a statement of Intent?

 

“The statement of intent: a reflective, concise piece of writing which details, evaluates, and contextualises each student’s self- authored project designed to identify and build upon personal aptitudes and strengths and articulate ideas clearly. An essential and transferable skill required for career progression as an artist practitioner.

You must create a plan, which can be managed, reviewed, and evaluated, and this will show how your own development will be articulated. You must choose proper resources to inform your work, create a way of collecting all of your information (via a blog or a sketchbook) and DOCUMENT DOCUMENT DOCUMENT all of your process. Did I mention you need to DOCUMENT your process? Yeah. Because if you don’t you’ll fail. 

Reflect on what drives you as an artist. Whether you are driven by the beauty of nature or rebelling against government oppression, search your past for any defining moments that may have shaped your perspective. Write these memories down on scrap paper as a reference source while writing your statement of purpose.

Research the artistic benefits of study in each studio art program you wish to apply to. Review the artwork of the instructors and read their personal biographies. This information should be available on the program website. Be certain to note how each program has the potential to enhance your artwork. Identify anything about your art or your personal character that may be an asset to these programs.

Open your statement of purpose with a compelling statement in three sentences that sums up your passion, your direction and your motivation for being an artist.

Explain your artwork and your experience as an artist in one to two paragraphs. Discuss any important courses taken in college that helped to shape your art, including any professors who influenced you.

 

Here’s a link with a couple hundred examples of blogs which focus on certain genres and fields relating to art and design. However, you’ll also be combining your research, with your own documentation of your work.

 

 

 

Generative Art and Chance for Visual Production

Sol LeWitt wrote that “the serial artist does not attempt to produce a beautiful or mysterious object but functions merely as a clerk cataloguing the results of his premise.”

sol_le_witt_grid

Generative art refers to art that in whole or in part has been created with the use of an autonomous system. An autonomous system in this context is generally one that is non-human and can independently determine features of an artwork that would otherwise require decisions made directly by the artist. (Thanks Wikipedia)

Generative systems can manifest themselves in generally two ways.

The system can be an extension of an artists intent, and original idea, and the work should reflect these intentions. In this situation the artist still possesses some control and works with elements which are generated by chance. In the following piece by Ellsworth Kelley he used several small compositions which were based upon cutting up multiple sheets of paper and matching them together by tossing them into the air, cutting the edges square, and then placing the smaller compositions into a larger grid. In this piece Kelley obviously determined the colors which were to be used however he let the compositions make themselves by chance. One should also note, that this piece worked out quite well, and that is probably why it is better known than other experiments that never saw the light of day.

Kelly-Meschers

In a following piece Kelley was noted to have said that he wished to work with more color after seeing an Ad Rheinhart exhibition. His pilgrimage into color was marked by the creation of a series of collages called the Spectrum Colors Arranged by Chance I to VIII. In this piece he created a grid, and then randomly assigned each square in the grid a color by mixing up a bunch of numbers in a hat and pulling them out randomly. Of course, there were still limits in place such as how many numbers can be used and restrictions.

Spectrum Colors Arranged by Chance I to VIII

William Burroughs talks about using a similar technique to generate poetry. Created by the Dadaists, popularized by Burroughs. The technique still lives on and has also been used by Thom Yorke (he’s in this band called Radiohead) and Kurt Cobain.

iching_coins

Divination techniques of the I Ching were used by John Cage to create paintings. Read more about them here.

cage_dereau23_new

He also used them to make musical compositions which Jorge could undoubtedly tell you more about.

Generative works can also be made from code, and therefore some argue that these sorts of works that the artist steps back even further and the system itself should take on the role of the creator.

“works where an unpredictable progressive virus operates on a degradation/transformation of an image. Using a C++ framework, Joseph Nechvatal and his programmer/collaborator Stephane Sikora have brought Nechvatal’s early computer virus project into the realm of artificial life (A-Life) (i.e. into a synthetic system that exhibits behaviors characteristic of natural living systems). With Computer Virus Project 2.0, elements of artificial life have been introduced in that viruses are modeled to be autonomous agents living in/off the image. The project simulates a population of active viruses functioning as an analogy of a viral biological system. Here the host of the virus are the digital files on which the computer-robotic assisted paintings in this show are based. Among the different techniques used here are models that result from embodied artificial intelligence and the paradigm of genetic programming.”

So what’s in common with all of these pieces? For starters each element was chosen by a human, and it would be difficult to argue that all generative art is not a byproduct of human decision. Kelley chose colors, Burroughs cut up newspapers, and Cage assigned notes on a piano (ok ok. and colors too…He was pretty good!..anyway). But the point is that all of these had a starting point and that was working with a specific medium and process. And many times it is important to note that they fit what many would assume is a chaotic process of generated components of their work and put it into a certain framework. Such as a grid, or a series (yep. That’s why Sol Lewitt is also called a Serial Artist). If you think your stuff looks like crap then put it in a square.

Screen Shot 2013-11-12 at 12.20.12 PM

You were all told to bring two mediums to class, one traditional, and one which is digital. You will be creating a system of making art which is based upon some chance operation to combine your two media. That means the final piece should exhibit both the qualities of the traditional media as well as the digital media. If you are stuck on how to create chance operations then first think about what are the components inherit in both of your mediums and how you can assign these components into a generative system. Paint has color, thickness, wetness, darkness, speed, application, texture, forms. Jpegs are made of code, colors, darknesses, computer screens, projected light, or turkeys.

How have people done chance operations? Roll some dice. Point to a word in a book at random. Throw stuff at the wall. Break stuff. roll some dice which determines which rock you should throw at a glass full of words and then make 10 images based off of the first ten words you pick up and then pour wax all over the images. Remember you can also do loads of chance operations using the internet or your computer. Use google to generate random words based upon random searches. Use Youtube to generate random screen grabs etc. Create some artificial intelligence which not only creates digital work but also spams leading art galleries emails with the images. But remember your final piece should combine a traditional medium with your digital medium.

nechvatal

“Hey what are some traditional mediums!”

Cement, Glass, Metal, Stone, Brick, Wood, Chalk, Charcoal, Crayon, Graphite, Marker, Pastel, Pen and ink, Pencil, Sand, Watercolour, Oils, Acylics, Inks, Dyes, Glues, film, wooden instruments,

“Ok cool. So what are some new mediums?”

Well, digital media is generally referred to as stuff that needs electricity to work. Like Graphic art software for illustration and animation, 3D computer graphics for sculpture and 3D animation, Digital photography and digital video for the capturing of photographs and footagecontrolling devices (touch screens or midi keyboards and kinnects) to bridge the gap between traditional techniques and digital painting, projections, screens, and programming.

“Well some of those are old too”

I know, but this conversation could go on for hours…. So stop proscratinating and start making art!

secret-life-of-sueprheroes-2-0411-970x399

Some challenges to consider.

Try to create the most conceptually potent work, with the least amount of effort. It is important to remember that there is no longer a division between how “good” something is, and the amount of labor required to make it. Duchamp signaled this when he created his fountain.

There is a difference between art and craft (or technique).

Postmodern art is not something you “get”. Ever. It isn’t a puzzle to solve. It’s an investigation that may not have any answers, or may not care about answers.

Artwork generally today is not about illustrating anything, and it is less insistent that the viewer come to work with any sort of predefined knowledge.

Styles of Drawing

So you have been drawing for months from life. You have piles of worn Bridgeman and Loomis books piled up by your desk, and you still suffer from a simple problem. You don’t seem to have anything close to a personal style developed. Fear not. There is light at the end of the tunnel. Developing a personal style consists of two main components, 1 is to draw as much from life as possible as this builds up what is called your Visual Library (This means that if you draw a guitar 20 times from life, you’ll have a better chance of drawing a realistic one from memory), the second component is to understand and get very familiar with the type of symbols you generally use to convey certain features (or other objects). One must first get familiar with the different styles of drawing first in order to get a good feel for your visual vocabulary (symbols) .

So what does it mean to understand the symbols which you use? You have already been taught not to use symbols but instead use abstraction to create the illusion of depth. And this is fine if you want to make paintings like a traditional painter. However, a large group of people don’t start drawing from life in this manner when they are 14 or 15, they start by drawing from cartoons, comic books, and from their heads. And these early symbols we make for a nose (for example) stick with us for all eternity, or so it seems. Let’s take a look at just how eyes are handled in three different cartoons in the image below.

In all of these examples we can see that the symbol for an eye can vary greatly, but still depict an eye. This is what we generally refer to as someone’s style. The nuts and bolts of someone’s style is based upon the symbols they use, and the techniques which are used to represent them. So we can look at the image below, and see how different symbols are also further stylized by the techniques in which they are depicted.

So how did Ralph Steadman find his personal style, and how did that differ from Todd McFarlane and Bill Plimpton? Well, in order to see how these people draw, we can simply dissect the way they construct a drawing. In the top drawing by Steadman we can see a lot of importance is given to the gesture of the figures, and this is followed by a very methodical and technical series of dark cross hatching marks. The line is fluid and wild, and this is then kept in place by the very meticulous cross hatching. Therefore we could safely say that if we wanted to develop a style similar to Ralph Steadman we should do loads of gesture drawings, as well as practice how to crosshatch. In the second drawing by Todd McFarlane we see highly developed and structured figure drawing in outrageous poses. These drawings were most likely done in pencil first and are heavily dependent on drawing the figure from memory. So in order to draw more like Todd McFarlane I would suggest studying the figure from life, as well as drawings from memory and building up compositions slowly. Starting with sketches first of multiple characters, and then resketching these onto a larger composition, and then finally finishing them with pen and ink. In the third drawing by Bill Plimpton we can see that his depictions of form are very painterly and that his mark making is fluid and free. So in order to draw more like Bill Plimpton I would suggest working with colored pencils (because of their ease of use in depicting large areas of value) and then slowly building these values up and finishing the drawing with darker marks to place the features of the face. Then, when working with pen we will treat the ink in a similar manner as the colored pencil and gently shade in large value shapes with a pen.

So, so far we have distinguished two important aspects of how to develop a personal style. One is the symbols which are used, and the second is the techniques which are employed (ie. how someone handles the medium). But by going through the different ways these artists constructed their drawings we also added a third important aspect which needs to be considered. And that is the ability to look at drawings (preferably by an artist you admire) and take apart how they are created. Every artist on the planet is influenced by other artists. The simplest way to say this is for you to find out what you think is cool. Once you have identified your favorite artists you should then do what I’ve done in the preceding paragraph, and that is to take apart to the best of your ability how their drawing were made. Now, you shouldn’t just bite their style, you want to create your own, but the good news is that a style will naturally come out after years of drawing and multiple attempts at recreating a variety of other styles. In fact, you may already have a style now, it just might be a really generic and crappy style. So ask yourself, how do you want to improve it? Is there an artist which could be influential? Are you interested in creating commercial work? Or work for animations or comic books? Well, then you’ve got to create a style which already meets commercial expectations. Which means that straying from the accepted commercial norms will be looked down upon (this can even be the case for well established Comic Book artists). Otherwise the sky’s the limit and by using the tactics outlined above (and with a lot of practice!) you’ll be able to create a personal style that not only satisfies you, but others as well. Just remember that these things don’t come over night!

Media Experimentation in Art and Design Class: Lesson 1 and 2: Elements of Design in Art

Thursday – Jeremiah:

 

Looking at the Principles and Elements of Design in Art

Introduction to the course and a brief discussion about imagery  and Visual Culture. What is visual culture and how does it effect all of our lives?

Introduction to Principles and Elements of Design. 

The Principles of Design

There are many basic concepts that underly the field of design. They are often categorized differently depending on philosophy or teaching methodology. The first thing we need to do is organize them, so that we have a framework for this discussion.

We can group all of the basic tenets of design into two categories: principles and elements. For this article, the principles of design are the overarching truths of the profession. They represent the basic assumptions of the world that guide the design practice, and affect the arrangement of objects within a composition. By comparison, the elements of design are the components of design themselves, the objects to be arranged.

Let’s begin by focusing on the principles of design, the axioms of our profession. Specifically, we will be looking at the following principles:

  • Balance
  • Rhythm
  • Proportion
  • Dominance
  • Unity

Balance

Balance is an equilibrium that results from looking at images and judging them against our ideas of physical structure (such as mass, gravity or the sides of a page). It is the arrangement of the objects in a given design as it relates to their visual weight within a composition. Balance usually comes in two forms: symmetrical and asymmetrical.

Symmetrical

Symmetrical balance occurs when the weight of a composition is evenly distributed around a central vertical or horizontal axis. Under normal circumstances it assumes identical forms on both sides of the axis. When symmetry occurs with similar, but not identical, forms it is called approximate symmetry. In addition, it is possible to build a composition equally around a central point resulting in radial symmetry1. Symmetrical balance is also known as formal balance.

Asymmetrical

Asymmetrical balance occurs when the weight of a composition is not evenly distributed around a central axis. It involves the arranging of objects of differing size in a composition such that they balance one another with their respective visual weights. Often there is one dominant form that is offset by many smaller forms. In general, asymmetrical compositions tend to have a greater sense of visual tension. Asymmetrical balance is also known as informal balance.

Horizontal
symmetry

Approximate
horizontal symmetry

Radial
symmetry

Rhythm

Rhythm is the repetition or alternation of elements, often with defined intervals between them. Rhythm can create a sense of movement, and can establish pattern and texture. There are many different kinds of rhythm, often defined by the feeling it evokes when looking at it.

  • Regular: A regular rhythm occurs when the intervals between the elements, and often the elements themselves, are similar in size or length.
  • Flowing: A flowing rhythm gives a sense of movement, and is often more organic in nature.
  • Progressive: A progressive rhythm shows a sequence of forms through a progression of steps.

Regular
rhythm

Flowing
rhythm

Progressive
rhythm

Proportion

Proportion is the comparison of dimensions or distribution of forms. It is the relationship in scale between one element and another, or between a whole object and one of its parts. Differing proportions within a composition can relate to different kinds of balance or symmetry, and can help establish visual weight and depth. In the below examples, notice how the smaller elements seem to recede into the background while the larger elements come to the front.

Dominance

Dominance relates to varying degrees of emphasis in design. It determines the visual weight of a composition, establishes space and perspective, and often resolves where the eye goes first when looking at a design. There are three stages of dominance, each relating to the weight of a particular object within a composition.

  • Dominant: The object given the most visual weight, the element of primary emphasis that advances to the foreground in the composition.
  • Sub-dominant: The element of secondary emphasis, the elements in the middle ground of the composition.
  • Subordinate: The object given the least visual weight, the element of tertiary emphasis that recedes to the background of the composition.

In the below example, the trees act as the dominant element, the house and hills as the secondary element, and the mountains as the tertiary element.

Unity

The concept of unity describes the relationship between the individual parts and the whole of a composition. It investigates the aspects of a given design that are necessary to tie the composition together, to give it a sense of wholeness, or to break it apart and give it a sense of variety. Unity in design is a concept that stems from some of the Gestalt theories of visual perception and psychology, specifically those dealing with how the human brain organizes visual information into categories, or groups2.

Gestalt theory itself is rather lengthy and complex, dealing in various levels of abstraction and generalization, but some of the basic ideas that come out of this kind of thinking are more universal.

Closure

Closure is the idea that the brain tends to fill in missing information when it perceives an object is missing some of its pieces. Objects can be deconstructed into groups of smaller parts, and when some of these parts are missing the brain tends to add information about an object to achieve closure. In the below examples, we compulsively fill in the missing information to create shape.

Continuance

Continuance is the idea that once you begin looking in one direction, you will continue to do so until something more significant catches your attention. Perspective, or the use of dominant directional lines, tends to successfully direct the viewers eye in a given direction. In addition, the eye direction of any subjects in the design itself can cause a similar effect. In the below example, the eye immediately goes down the direction of the road ending up in the upper right corner of the frame of reference. There is no other dominant object to catch and redirect the attention.

Similarity, Proximity and Alignment

Items of similar size, shape and color tend to be grouped together by the brain, and a semantic relationship between the items is formed. In addition, items in close proximity to or aligned with one another tend to be grouped in a similar way. In the below example, notice how much easier it is to group and define the shape of the objects in the upper left than the lower right.

Related concepts

There are many additional concepts that are related to the principles of design. These can include specific terms and/or techniques that are in some way based on one or more of the above tenets. In they end, they add to the collection of compositional tools available for use by the designer.

Contrast or Opposition

Contrast addresses the notion of dynamic tensionÔthe degree of conflict that exists within a given design between the visual elements in the composition.

Positive and Negative Space

Positive and negative space refers to the juxtaposition of figure and ground in a composition. The objects in the environment represent the positive space, and the environment itself is the negative space.

Rule of Thirds

The rule of thirds is a compositional tool that makes use of the notion that the most interesting compositions are those in which the primary element is off center. Basically, take any frame of reference and divide it into thirds placing the elements of the composition on the lines in between.

Visual Center

The visual center of any page is just slightly above and to the right of the actual (mathematical) center. This tends to be the natural placement of visual focus, and is also sometimes referred to as museum height.

Color and Typography

Many would place color and typography along side the five principals I have outlined above. I personally believe both to be elements of design, so I’ll give them some attention in my next column. In addition, both topics are so robust that I plan on writing an entire article about each of them in the future.

——————————————————————————————

AND HERE WE HAVE OUR ELEMENTS OF DESIGN

Lets look at all the main elements of design in art and how by manipulating these simple concepts we can create a multitude of different compositions.

Line 

Line:  An element of art that is used to define shape, contours, and outlines, also to suggest mass and volume.  It may be a continuous mark made on a surface with a pointed tool or implied by the edges of shapes and forms.

Characteristic of Line are:

  • Width– thick, thin, tapering, uneven
  • Length – long, short, continuous, broken
  • Direction– horizontal, vertical, diagonal, curving, perpendicular, oblique, parallel, radial, zigzag
  • Focus– sharp, blurry, fuzzy, choppy
  • Feeling– sharp, jagged, graceful, smooth

Types of Line:

  1. Outlines– Lines made by the edge of an object or its silhouette.
  2. Contour Lines– Lines that describe the shape of an object and the interior detail.
  3. Gesture Lines– Line that are energetic and catches the movement and gestures of an active figure.
  4. Sketch Lines– Lines that captures the appearance of an object or impression of a place.
  5. Calligraphic Lines– Greek word meaning “beautiful writing.”  Precise, elegant handwriting or lettering done by hand. Also artwork that has flowing lines like an elegant handwriting.
  6. Implied Line– Lines that are not actually drawn but created by a group of objects seen from a distance.  The direction an object is pointing to, or the direction a person is looking at.

  Name the Line:

1.    Below are five boxes.  Create a different type of line for each box.

2.    In the blank under the box come up with a name for that line that describes it.

 _____________    ____________    _____________    _____________    _____________ 

Color

Color comes form light; if it weren’t for light we would have no color.  Light rays move in a straight path from a light source.  Within this light rays are all the rays of colors in the spectrumor rainbow.  Shining a light into a prism will create a rainbow of colors because it separates the color of the spectrum.  When the light rays hits an object our eyes responds to the light that is bounced back and we see that color.  For example a red ball reflects all the red light rays.  As artist we use pigments in the form of powder or liquid paints to create color.

Categories of Color

Color Wheels a tool used to organize color.  It is made up of:

·        Primary Colors-Red, Yellow, Blue these color cannot be mixed, they must be bought in some form.

·      Secondary Color-Orange, Violet, Green, these colors are created by mixing two primaries.

·      Intermediate Colors– Red Orange, Yellow Green, Blue Violet, etc.; mixing a primary with a secondary creates these colors. 

·      Complementary Colors-are colors that are opposite each other on the color wheel.  When placed next to each other they look bright and when mixed together they neutralize each other. 

Color Harmonies

Color Harmonies is when an artist uses certain combinations of colors that create different looks or feelings.

·        Analogous Colors are colors that are next to each other on the color wheel for example red, red orange, and orange are analogous colors.

·      Triadic Harmony is where three equally spaced colors on the color wheel are used for example, yellow, Red, Blue is a triadic harmony color scheme.

·      Monochromatic is where one color is used but in different values and intensity.

·      Warm colors are on one side of the color wheel and they give the felling of warmth for example red, orange and yellow are the color of fire and feel warm.

·      Cool colors are on the other side of the color wheel and they give the feeling of coolness for example blue, violet, are the color of water, and green are the color of cool grass.

 

On the back of this sheet of paper create a color wheel.  Be sure to include the primary, secondary and intermediate colors.  Use colored pencils to create your colors.

  

Shape 

Shape:  When a line crosses itself or intersects with other lines to enclose a space it creates a shape.  Shape is two-dimensional it has heights and width but no depth.

Categories of Shapes:

  • Geometric Shapes-Circles, Squares, rectangles and triangles.  We see them in architecture and manufactured items.
  • Organic Shapes-Leaf, seashells, flowers.  We see them in nature and with characteristics that are free flowing, informal and irregular.
  • Positive Shapes-In a drawing or painting positive shapes are the solid forms in a design such as a bowl of fruit.  In a sculpture it is the solid form of the sculpture.
  • Negative Shapes-In a drawing it is the space around the positive shape or the shape around the bowl of fruit.  In sculpture it is the empty shape around and between the sculptures.
  • Static Shape-Shapes that appears stable and resting.
  • Dynamic Shape-Shapes that appears moving and active.

Create a Shape

In box 1 create a design with Geometrical Shapes

In box 2 create a design with Organic Shapes

1                                                                              2


In these two boxes below draw the same picture in each box.  The first box shade the positive space and the second box shade the negative space.

Space

Space is the three-dimensionality of a sculpture.  With a sculpture or architecture you can walk around them, look above them, and enter them, this refers to the space of the sculpture or architecture.  A three-dimensional object will have height, width, and depth.

Space in a two-dimensional drawing or painting refers to the arrangement of objects on the picture plane.  The picture plane is the surface of your drawing paper or canvas.  You can have a picture plane that is a crowded space with lots of objects or an empty space with very few objects in the picture plane.  A two-dimensional piece of art has heights and width but no depth.  The illusion of depth can be achieved by using perspective.  This is the technique used to have your picture look likes it is moving to the distance like a landscape or cityscape. 

Categories of Space

·        Positive space-Like in positive shape it is the actual sculpture or building.

·        Negative space-Also like negative shape it is the space around the sculpture or building.

·        Picture Plane is the flat surface of your drawing paper or canvas.

·        Composition is the organization and placement of the elements on your picture plane.

·        Focal Point is the object or area you want the viewer to look at first.

Types of Perspective

·        Nonlinear Perspective is the method of showing depth that incorporates the following techniques.

o      Position-Placing an object higher on the page makes it appear farther back then objects placed lower on the page.

o      Overlapping-When an object overlaps another object it appears closer to the viewer, and the object behind the object appears farther away.

o      Size Variation-Smaller objects look farther away in the distance.  Larger objects look closer.

o      Color-Bright colors look like they are closer to you and neutral colors look like they are farther away.

o      Value-Lighter values look like they are farther back and darker value look like they are closer.  For example in a landscape the mountains often look bluish and lighter then the trees or houses that are closer to you.

·        Linear Perspective is the method of using lines to show the illusion of depth in a picture.  The following are types of linear perspective.

o     One-point perspective-When lines created by the sides of tables or building look like that are pointing to the distance and they all meet at one point on the horizon this is one-point perspective. To see an example stand in the middle of the hallway and look at the horizontal lines in the brick or the corner where the ceiling meets the wall.  See how they move to one point on the horizon.

o     Two-point perspective-Here the lines look like they are meeting at two points on the horizon line.

 

Texture 

Texture is the surface quality of an object.  A rock may be rough and jagged.  A piece of silk may be soft and smooth and your desk may feel hard and smooth.  Texture also refers to the way a picture is made to look rough or smooth. 

Categories of Texture

·        Real Texture is the actual texture of an object.  Artist may create real texture in art to give it visual interest or evoke a feeling.  A piece of pottery may have a rough texture so that it will look like it came from nature or a smooth texture to make it look like it is machine made.

·      Implied Texture is the where a two-dimensional piece of art is made to look like a certain texture but in fact is just a smooth piece of paper.  Like a drawing of a tree trunk may look rough but in fact it is just a smooth piece of paper

Using your pencil create different types of textures in the boxes below. 

Explain what the texture is at the bottom of each box.

Value 

 

Value is the range of lightness and darkness within a picture.  Value is created by a light source that shines on an object creating highlights and shadows.  It also illuminates the local or actual color of the subject.  Value creates depth within a picture making an object look three dimensional with highlights and cast shadows, or in a landscape where it gets lighter in value as it recedes to the background giving the illusion of depth.

Categories of Values

·            Tint is adding white to color paint to create lighter values such as light blue or pink.

·        Shade is adding black to paint to create dark values such as dark blue or dark red.

·        High-Key is where the picture is all light values.

·        Low-Key is where the picture is all dark values.

·        Value Contrast is where light values are placed next to dark values to create contrast or strong differences.

·        Value Scale is a scale that shows the gradual change in value from its lightest value, white to its darkest value black. 

Create a 5 value, Value Scale.

Beginning with the box on the right leave it blank, it will be the lightest value of the value scale.  The box on the far left will be the darkest value, so shade it in completely black.  The three remaining shade in to show a gradual change form the lightest to the darkest.

Form          

Form is the three-dimensionality of an object.  Shape is only two-dimensional; form is three-dimensional.  You can hold a form; walk around a form and in some cases walk inside a form. In drawing or painting using value can imply form.  Shading a circle in a certain manner can turn it into a sphere.  

Types of Form

Draw and correctly shade the four basic Forms.

            Cube,                              

            Cylinder                            

            Cone                               

 

 When looking at the Elements of Design in Art we can now hopefully see correlations between what is often regarded as high art, and also advertising and the visual culture which surrounds all of us everyday. Building up a working vocabulary about how to talk about these elements will be important as you move forward into the HND program. 

 

Friday – Ryan:

Spiel about attendance and expectations

Class overview (what is design, what will we learn)

Intro to computer graphics theory (raster/vector etc)

Personal Experimental Studies Class:Lesson 5, and 6:Photoshop Animation Tutorial

Finalizing your Frames and a Photoshop Animation Tutorial

1st Class: Krystof: Studio time working on your animated short. You should now begin to start photographing your frames in preperation for the finalization and post production process involving your work.

If you are using a small set for a photo based stop motion using real objects it will be important to figure out how you will use lighting to achieve the mood you are attempting. In the video below we can see a creative solution to light brick films (Stop motions made with legos) by using two adjustable desk lamps.

How you light a subject also will drastically change a characters image and can give a viewer a clear vision as to what mood is being portrayed.

If you are doing all of your sequences on paper then you will have the option of either scanning, or photographing them one by one. It is also important to keep the resolution of your pictures relatively low as they will be easier to manage in Photoshop later.

You should have all of your sequences finished and ready for animating for next class.

 

2nd Class: Final Class of studio time.You will now be shown how to use Photoshop’s animation toolbar to begin to animate the individual frames which you have created.

Photoshop Animation Tutorial

The reason why we use photoshop to animate our sequences is because it is a simple way to begin onion skinning your image. In the past onion skinning was commonly done on a light box, with the intent of being able to see a previous sequence could be seen and small adjustments could be made in order to achieve the illusion of movement. Now the reason why you will be onion skinning your sequences is because we want to eliminate any sort of bounce or shakiness that can happen from not correctly lining up your photos. In photoshop after you have imported all of your individual photos/scans onto layers, you can then see the previous layer quite simply by adjusting the opacity of the layer on top (or the selected layer). This is a necessary step because when you first play your animation you will see that there may be large jumps between frames. The easiest way to reconcile this is to pick a certain element (perhaps the eyes, or something else which would stay in the same position) and then onion skin each layer until one element is always in the same place.

Personal Experimental Studies. Lesson 3 and 4; Frame by Frame Animation

 

Frame by Frame Animations

frame by frame animation

1st Class: Krystof

Today we will be looking at various stop motion animated shorts using a variety of mediums, and begin storyboarding our projects. Now’s the time to start planning how your frame by frame animation will look and feel, and begin to document how you will be illustrating the emotion which you have been assigned.

If you are drawing, or using real object to make your stop motion you must begin to consider how your subjects will be lit. Prague College has lights available from their media center which can be checked out by students. These lights, and how to properly use them will be introduced.

If you are using a character in your piece then you must also look at different angles, and shots which can evoke certain feelings.


After looking at some examples of short animations will then finalize our storyboards in preperation for production next class with

stopmotion clay





2nd Class:

You will be required to bring your media to class you have been assigned. We will then be working with our mediums in class and I will help students individually. This is the production phase of the assignment and it is extremely important to be present during these classes as it is very easy to fall behind.

Drawing Class Lesson 1

Today after a quick introduction to the course, we’ll get straight into the first assignment which is to create 3 views of a character which you will later animate in your Animation Techniques program. The first hurdle to overcome is to give our characters some 3 dimensional qualities.  Many times in the past these characters have come out looking quite flat and we want to avoid this. Therefore we will be trying a 3/4 view along with the frontal and side view.

 

sam_example_orthos

 

anime_studio_rigs

 

Shapes often look flat when we use symbols, such as a symbol for a sun, or other early shapes which elementary school children use in the creation of their drawings. The first thing we need to understand is that drawings can have form, and more often than not, form is more important than anything else in the creation of a realistic looking 3d Object. Take a look at the eyes below, in the first drawing they appear very flat, whereas if we think of the eye balls as two large spheres we can begin to carve our forms out of the space.

 

loomis-shapes

So today we will be working with some very simple sketches of our characters, and attempting to add an element of 3 dimensional space to them. This is a required part of the assignment, so keep your drawings for later submission. In general it is very important to get a sketchbook or something where you can keep all of your drawings, because in the first half of the semester you will be creating many drawings which you will later have to compile into PDF files for submission.

This tutorial on how to draw Loomis Shapes can be helpful for review.

 

And here is a nice step by step about how Loomis suggest you make a head for a cartoon.

loomis-cartoon-head-step-by-step

 

Welcome to Drawing Techniques and Processes.

During this year you will embark on 4 different assignments designed to make you better at drawing, as well as develop a better understanding of color and how it’s used.

So how does drawing relate to Interactive Media, and why is it important? Well, for starters, Drawing is involved in some way in every major program which you will be studying with perhaps the exception of sound. A better understanding of drawing will help you in virtually every area of study which you choose to pursue in Interactive Media.

If you have a tablet, and prefer to work digitally, then that’s fine. I have no problem with it. In fact, as you’ll notice throughout the year, all of your assignments can be completed in a variety of mediums and this class is much more open to experimentation than you may think.

While the technology and tools have changed over the years. The basic principles stay the same. That’s why I’m interested in what you want to create, and why you chose to study in the Fine Art;Experimental Media Program.

The important thing to note here is that while methods and processes of drawing have changed greatly over the years. That new programs, and brushes are simply just tools. If you are thinking that this class, or this program will merely teach you how to use certain programs (such as Flash, Aftereffects, 3dsMax, etc.) then you are sadly mistaken. Don’t get me wrong, you will learn all of these programs during your time here, but these are just tools. Tools which millions of other people know how to use, and which you can teach yourself how to use just by watching YouTube Tutorials. What I’m interested in in this class is how you plan on making your mark, and how that mark will be different from others. If you’re not sure about what you want to focus on then that’s fine too! This is a place for experimentation and discovery.