Tag: holiday

Painting Intensive: Part 4

Todays Artist is James Audubon

John James Audubon was a French-American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter. He was notable for his expansive studies to document all types of American birds and for his detailed illustrations that depicted the birds in their natural habitats.

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This part of the class we will forget about the broad brushstrokes to create entire landscapes and change our perspective to studying foliage and painting it with watercolors. Immediately your senses will shift from focusing on a photograph and you should see the benefits and complexities of working with a real leaves, twigs and branches in front of you.

But how to start? For this section we will not be doing any preliminary drawings, but instead will be working directly on our paper with watercolors. So as to not go into the task without any background lets first look at some common ways to construct leaves and trees with watercolors.

 

 

The key to painting foliage with watercolors is to combine both your wet in wet (that means adding wet paint to an already wet surface) and wet on dry techniques. As we have already covered you must have a good understanding of the value scale which you are using in the painting before you even start painting.  I would suggest limiting your palette to about 8 variations of yellow to green to to dark green/blue.

First we will be working with just generating some brush strokes, and from there we will begin constructing a tree starting with bright lemon yellow (don’t worry if you don’t have the exact color, any bright yellow will work).  With your yellow start with the top left of your tree, then before this yellow is dry you will be adding just a little bit of light yellow-green to form the bottom of your tree.

Remember to leave some holes for the sky to peek through.

Then, while this is all still wet start dabbing a few deeper colors into the tree to represent some darker values.

Go darker, and darker towards blue-green at the bottom right hand of the tree.

Then let everything dry (you’ll notice that watercolors get lighter as they dry)

Put in a few last dashes on leaf shadows ( LESS IS MORE! )

Then mix up some ochre/brown and make a dab for the trunk making sure that the trunk vanishes under the leaves and doesn’t appear to be on top of them.

 

Now that we have created this tree we will be moving on to the foliage in front of us on our desks (If it’s nice outside we can also go to Riegrovy Sady park and paint there. ) Using the same methods (working from light to dark) you will be creating a watercolor painting of your plant, leaves, stems, twigs, and flowers.  For this you should make a very VERY light contour line sketch detailing the different values present.

Painting Intensive: Part 6

This part’s artist is Chuck Close

Charles Thomas “Chuck” Close is an American painter and photographer who achieved fame as a photorealist, through his massive-scale portraits.

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This section of the painting intensive deals with blending acrylics and creating form. We will be using the dry brush blending technique which can be seen in the video below as well as have an introduction to glazing. You will be working from a still life of objects which have been painted white and lit in front of you.

Once again you will be drawing light sketches based upon the contours of the objects placed in front of you as well as the large value shapes. From there you will be using mainly white, and a grey mixture which I will teach you how to mix using your three primaries. These paintings should look rather dull, but full of form.

Once we have created our form paintings we will explore some very simple glazing with acrylics. Please note that glazing depends on many factors which are largely determined through trial and error. However, the main objective in creating a believable glaze will be to minimize the streakiness of the color as much as possible.

Painting Intensive: Part 8

This part’s artist is Alyssa Monks (1977- present)

“When I began painting the human body, I was obsessed with it and needed to create as much realism as possible. I chased realism until it began to unravel and deconstruct itself,” Alyssa states, “I am exploring the possibility and potential where representational painting and abstraction meet – if both can coexist in the same moment.”

For this section we will be focusing on learning to mix flesh tones and using this towards creating portraits of one another.

For creating flesh tones we will be mixing our cadmium red with yellow to begin. Once we’ve achived a strong orange we will then take a little bit of blue which will push the color towards brown. Using this as a base we can go down the value scale by adding more blue and red to the mix, and going up the value scale by adding our mixture to titanium white (note that we are not adding white to our mixture!)

Once we have gained a good understanding how to make our value scale of flesh tones we will procede with a drawing of another student. This should be a loose sketch which can be built upon and easily navigated with the different value shapes. Upon completing our drawings we will then begin painting each others portraits using both local, and non local color as well as the palette we have just learned how to mix of flesh tones. These are still basically extended sketches and shouldn’t be treated as finished works. We are going for broad shapes of value, and not small details. Use large brushes and mix loads of paint to work with.

Painting Intensive: Part 11

The artist for today should be looked at before class as today we will be going on a trip to do some painting outside.

George Inness (May 1, 1825 – August 3, 1894) was an influential American landscape painter. His work was influenced, in turn, by that of the old masters, the Hudson River school, the Barbizon school, and, finally, by the theology of Emanuel Swedenborg, whose spiritualism found vivid expression in the work of Inness’ maturity. Often called “the father of American landscape painting”

Today we will be meeting at the school at 9 like normal. From here we will each grab our easels and then walk to Hlavni Nadrazi where we will be taking a train to Cernosice (a 20 minute train ride from Prague. 61Kc round trip) to paint outdoors. Be prepared to paint! Feel free to use the medium, or a combination of any mediums which you are comfortable with. I’ll be meeting with each of you individually throughout the day, and we will be having lunch in Cernosice. This class does not have two parts, but the entire class will be devoted to painting outdoors.