Tag: portrait

Painting Intensive: Part 9

This Part’s artist is Hieronymus Bosch (1450 – 1516)

Hieronymus Bosch was an Early Netherlandish painter. His work is known for its use of fantastic imagery to illustrate moral and religious concepts and narratives.

Now we’ve finally arrived at what is beyond a shadow of a doubt one of the oldest and most respected artist mediums. Oil paint. The medium itself has taken on an almost mythic quality with many students frequently being scared of using it as it isn’t exactly cheap, and this fear can cause many students to tighten up and produce awkward paintings (sometimes awkward paintings are kind of nice too but anyway) . For this reason we are not going into any new imagery yet with oil paint. We’re just going to start playing around with it as a new medium and use it in conjunction with some of the older paintings which we produced.

For the first exercise we will be looking back on some of our value scales as well as our form paintings we made with acrylics, and we will be using oil paint to glaze on top of these paintings. I’ll have some of my own glaze medium which I’ve mixed that you can try out, but just as with acrylic glazing our goal is to make our glazes as clear and seamless as possible with the smallest amount of streaks.

Once we are finished with experimenting with glazing on our older paintings and exercises we will be repainting our acrylic portraits. Not on top of the old portraits, but creating a new painting in oils based upon our old portrait done in acrylics.

Personal Experimental Studies Class: 9 and 10: Ink Wash Techniques

Photographing Portraits and Ink Wash Techniques

 

1st Class: Krystof

During todays class you will all be taking photos of yourselves with the camera and lights from the school.

2nd Class:  Today we will be drawing self portraits in pen and ink from the images which were taken on Monday.

First we will “Live Trace” all of our images in Illustrator. If you don’t know how to Live Trace then here’s a quick tutorial.

By Live tracing the image we will get a clear “value scale” map of our images. A value simply refers to a shadow.  Since we don’t have a lot of time to spend drawing these we can use the same transfer technique we used on our stencils so we can have more time working with the materials, and many of the drawing elements will be already taken care of.

ink wash techniques

In this video tutorial we can see how to simply make different values for making washes with ink.

You will be using the photographed portraits made with Krystof and then you will be drawing these images with pen and ink, and then use ink wash techniques to fill in the final value shapes and variations.