Tag: study abroad

Painting Intensive: Part 6

This part’s artist is Chuck Close

Charles Thomas “Chuck” Close is an American painter and photographer who achieved fame as a photorealist, through his massive-scale portraits.

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This section of the painting intensive deals with blending acrylics and creating form. We will be using the dry brush blending technique which can be seen in the video below as well as have an introduction to glazing. You will be working from a still life of objects which have been painted white and lit in front of you.

Once again you will be drawing light sketches based upon the contours of the objects placed in front of you as well as the large value shapes. From there you will be using mainly white, and a grey mixture which I will teach you how to mix using your three primaries. These paintings should look rather dull, but full of form.

Once we have created our form paintings we will explore some very simple glazing with acrylics. Please note that glazing depends on many factors which are largely determined through trial and error. However, the main objective in creating a believable glaze will be to minimize the streakiness of the color as much as possible.

Painting Intensive: Part 8

This part’s artist is Alyssa Monks (1977- present)

“When I began painting the human body, I was obsessed with it and needed to create as much realism as possible. I chased realism until it began to unravel and deconstruct itself,” Alyssa states, “I am exploring the possibility and potential where representational painting and abstraction meet – if both can coexist in the same moment.”

For this section we will be focusing on learning to mix flesh tones and using this towards creating portraits of one another.

For creating flesh tones we will be mixing our cadmium red with yellow to begin. Once we’ve achived a strong orange we will then take a little bit of blue which will push the color towards brown. Using this as a base we can go down the value scale by adding more blue and red to the mix, and going up the value scale by adding our mixture to titanium white (note that we are not adding white to our mixture!)

Once we have gained a good understanding how to make our value scale of flesh tones we will procede with a drawing of another student. This should be a loose sketch which can be built upon and easily navigated with the different value shapes. Upon completing our drawings we will then begin painting each others portraits using both local, and non local color as well as the palette we have just learned how to mix of flesh tones. These are still basically extended sketches and shouldn’t be treated as finished works. We are going for broad shapes of value, and not small details. Use large brushes and mix loads of paint to work with.